CAFE standards controlled by our Government? Can someone explain why?

Page 3 of 3  
wrote:


It sure seems the Greeny car buyers are ONLY looking at MPG and whether or not it's a hybrid.
Newer technology always costs more until more people by that technology.
I do no see a large jump towards greener cars, in fact I see people in middle-class incomes tending to buy gas-guzzlers which much cheaper technology. They're willing to pay high prices for gas and do not buy into the CO2 myth either.
People settle for 25+ mpg cars/trucks now and they want a car/truck with power and comfort. This means they want a bigger car that is 100% gasoline powered.
The gov't will come along at some point and force us all into expensive cars with high technology built-in.
Has it occurred to anyone that if the America driver shaves 10%-20% of their gas consumption that OPEC will simply raise the price of oil to make up the difference in profit lost?
$5-10$ per gallon gas will happen and that savings will be gone in a flash.
I guess some people just what to 'feel warm' inside and not care that their actions forced poorer people to become more poor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bob Brown" <.> wrote in message wrote:

The point of a hybrid drivetrain is to *reduce* fuel consumption while at the same time allowing the consumer to have a comfortable ride in a car that will last at least 7 to 12 years. Because of the higher cost of the hybrid drivetrain, the consumer doesn't really save money until the reduced fuel consumption has covered the premium paid for the hybrid drivetrain.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 21:50:31 -0500, "Ray O" <rokigawaATtristarassociatesDOTcom> wrote:

I would have NO interest in a car that only lasted 12 years.
....says the happy driver of a '92 Corolla Wagon......
--

Scott in Florida




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Apr 2007 03:02:04 GMT, Scott in Florida

I seriously doubt the 'average' lifespan of a Prius will end up being 12 years. I said average. I also doubt the 'average' life will be 200K miles, yes I said average.
Everyone has that 'story' of this 'car' that gets 477k miles because they did the right things and took proper care unlike those 'other people'.
1 out of 100 maybe, you and someone else but the others out here aren't going to get those years or miles out of a car.
Which was my point, but you can all tell the fish stories.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 21:50:31 -0500, "Ray O" <rokigawaATtristarassociatesDOTcom> wrote:

Wouldn't that take 300,000 - 500,000 miles?
I'd love to see an article on the person who is first with a 100k prius. I'd also like a copy of his credit card/other accounts to see if he made any 'repairs' during that time.
I heard someone say 200K miles was the payoff point on the Prius, but what if like a lot of people you never make it to 200K miles?
So cars are unlucky, even if they "average" 200K miles of life. Every car of that model is not going to get 200K miles even with proper care.
If I offered a fund where you give me $5K per year for a return of $2 Million in 30 years? Sounds good. Ok, what if I said "You can't touch it before 30 years even if you were willing to take a penalty"?
I'd probably keep the money of 90% of the people.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bob Brown" <.> wrote in message wrote:

No, not really. It is difficult to determine the "break even" point on a Prius because there is no conventionally powered version of the car. My guess is that the break-even point on a Prius vs. a 4 cylinder Camry is around 75,000 miles with gas at $3.00 per gallon. The 2 biggest variables are fuel cost and driving conditions.

There are quite a few Prius with well over 100,000 miles, most notably in Taxi service in NYC. The article I read said that there were no repairs other than normal maintenance.

100,000 miles used to be considered the average life of a passenger vehicle, but 200,000 is very common now.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 23:35:43 -0500, "Ray O" <rokigawaATtristarassociatesDOTcom> wrote:

So those 10 year/100K miles warranty are now basically 3-5 year warranties.
Nice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bob Brown" <.> wrote in message

It is if one drives 20,000 to 30,000 miles a year.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Apr 2007 15:14:28 -0500, Ray O wrote:

Yo!
Thing is, I split it between three cars.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Buying a $20K car, making payments, with interest and depreciation the car was bought for around $25K and five years later is maybe worth $10K, plus all that repair work and getting busy, in the hybrid's case, finding a new battery. Batteries lifetime stamp doesn't say "4ever and ever"
I wonder what those batteries do to the environment when they're recycled?
Or when they're made?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 29 Apr 2007 01:58:38 -0400, wrote:

I have one car I paid $15,000 for. One that cost $600 (plus about $1200 in parts so far) and one that cost $150+$400 for parts. So, I'm under the $20,000 so far...
Let's see how much more the Supra can nickle and dime me for, like a Toyota tech friend of mine said it would...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 23 Apr 2007 11:03:08 -0400, C. E. White wrote:

Actually, the 'loop' for Highway ratings is 45 MPH. Nowhere near actual driving conditions (Unless you're in LA where it should be 8MPH...)
And in all actuality, EVERY Toyota I have ever owned has bested it's EPA Highway rating by at least 10%...COMBINED mileage. My Corolla GTS was rated at 32 MPG highway, I got 36 MPG combined. My Corolla SR-5 was rated at 28 MPG highway, I got 34 Combined. My Tercel was rated 33 MPG Highway, I got 45 MPG Combined. And I don't drive like an Old Man, either. A lot of trips in the Tercel were at least 70 MPH, and a few at 80. Likewaise, the GTS was always run on the highway at 70 MPH, even when the speed limit was 55. Running at 55 MPH dropped the Combined MPG to 30 or less.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

On a MPG/Cost of car, ratio, how do those cars rank? 1 2 3 etc
I ask because I can find a 15 yr old 200K miles car in the newspaper for $900 and it would get no more than 12MPG. So my MPG/Cost of car ratio would kick some ass.
With a new car around $20K, and my imaginary car costing $900, do you realize how many gallons of gas I could buy with $19,100 ? How many miles could I get @ my 12MPG? In the long run, even 5 years or longer, I would win in money saved. I don't see how this could even be disagreed on.
Get the calc.exe handy please.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.