Quality of the 2005 Taurus SE

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On Sat, 4 Dec 2004 07:43:25 -0600, Andrew Rossmann


It does not matter in my opinion how long it will take to cause problems. It may cause problems, no matter how you reason it and will a customer accept this on a new car. It causes a problem with me that although the parts were painted the rust is showing and in fact has taken off the paint. I am looking at the quality of work as well, as it states on the window sticker: Quality is job #1 I would assume this is for all the parts of the car. Others are also telling me not to worry too much and maybe I am a picky customer. Maybe I am too picky, that is why I like to read the opinion of other people (and I do appreciate the comments).
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Surface rust is inevitable on all exposed iron. Unless the rust is constantly fed by exposure to water and chemicals you have nothing to worry about. The rust will form an oxidized barrier several thousands of an inch thick and will stop further attacks. (the rust browning treatment was used on gun barrels for centuries as a protection from rust) Your engine heads and block are very thick. For rust to wear into them to any appreciable depth would take several decades. Now if the motor were in marine service and exposed to salt water (moisture and chemicals remember?) then you would have reason to worry. If your state uses salt or some other chloride to de-ice the roads each winter, it would be prudent to rinse the engine and the under side of the car including the wheel wells every time you get the chance. If rust does developed, it will be the freeze plugs that go first as they are made of stamped sheet metal. As you note, alloy engines don't rust. So, if you were purchasing alloy motored cars in the past you might be shocked by what you see under the hood of an iron motored car. If you see paint blistering on sheet metal, get worked up. If you see rust eating into the fire wall or wheel wells, get worked up. If you see rust in the door sills or around the cowl get worked up. But a rust covered iron block is nothing to worry about. Shoot, I recently restored a 41 Dodge Power Wagon that spent the last 45 years in a Missouri field buried up to the top of the frame rails. The sheet metal was shot and the frame and block heavily coated with rust but when we sandblasted them they came out unscathed. I've seen this same scenario on several of the 6 cars and trucks I've restored. They were all pitted to be sure but nothing serious. IMHO, I wouldn't loose any sleep over surface rust on an engine block.
--
R. J. Talley
Teacher/James Madison Fellow
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says...

off. It is not poor quality to not paint them. Your not being picky, your confusing what defines quality.
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I am sure a layer of rust (maybe 1/1000 inch thick) would form when the cars are on the car carrier, sitting on the lot, etc. The only way you are going to avoid this is to paint the engine (or use aluminum). This is nothing to worry about. within a month or so, a layer crude (engine oil, road dirt, etc.) will form on the engine and prevent further rust.

Their not painted.

No. They will be coarted with oil and road dirt.

Who are "we"?

They just see the layer of dirt and oil.

Don't worry. It won't hurt anything.
Jeff
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Aldert E. van der Laan opined in

An amazing amount of repartee for a non-issue.
Surface rust does no harm.. especially on cast iron, it is when that turns to a rust scale that there's a problem.
Cast Iron resists scale formation as you can see on almost any old manifold.
The REAL culprit is in certain steel alloys...I havent seen or heard of a domestic exhaust pipe -manifold to cat- rusting out for years..
To the contrary was my kid's 5 year old renault (Eagle) which manifold to cat essentially crumbled under the assault of midwest road salt.
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Look under the hood of any brand vehicle with CAST IRON parts and you will find surface rust. Look under the hood of any old car with CAST IRON parts and you will see those parts are still there, still rusted. Not too worry those parts will be around longer than you ;)
mike hunt
"Aldert E. van der Laan" wrote:

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