Motorists vs traffic cameras

Page 3 of 6  
On 2009-03-28 12:47:38 -0700, "JoeSpareBedroom"


Hell, most people in most states can't drive safely while driving.
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95%, as a matter of fact. My son says it's 98%.
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On 2009-03-28 14:49:54 -0700, "JoeSpareBedroom"

I'd agree with that except for Texas.
Sorry. We're perfect.
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People still die in Texas, though, and dead people make up a significant portion of drivers, along with the legally blind.
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On 2009-03-28 17:02:44 -0700, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Only due to the out-of-staters. As I said, we're perfect.
Obviously I'm not serious, but there is something to driving skills being acquired at a younger age. Most people I know drove trucks, etc., before they were legally able to do so on the street. Someone driving since twelve with twenty years experience is generally a far better driver than someone who started at thirty also having twenty years experience. Younger minds learn easier and better, just like playing an instrument.
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BAAAPPPPP Wrong answer. In Arkansas, we said that some Texas drivers were missing the extra letter S that should be on their front plate's state name. We also used to say Texas had front plates so Arkansas drivers could get out of the way.
Sir Charles THE Curmudgeon
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I won't tell you what we still say about Arkies.
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Although I don't have any ancestors from Arkansas, I lived there 11 years. I do have ancestors from:
Mississippi Georgia South Carolina North Carolina Viriginia Maryland Pennsylvania Ohio Kentucky Indiana New York (sorry about that, nobody's perfect)
Sir Charles THE Curmudgeon
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Joe just doesn't get that I'm IGNORING his stupid statements and he can go f f f f fade away (Talkin bout my generation.)
Sir Charles THE Curmudgeon
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The problem is not the cell phone, but the lack of common sense. It is a proven fact that they are a distraction, but used properly in some circumstances, no problem. Used by a teenager in traffic, it can be a real menace. Texting even worse. There have been people killed while doing that here in CT.
We have a loosely worded law that states "distraction" so even with a hands free, the police can issue a ticket to the morons not paying attention.
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wrote in message

I've seen stupid teenage bimbos chatting on the phone pulling out into traffic without looking, holding the cell phone and chatting while she drove to her destination, where she turned off, still chatting, because she pulled right out in front of me and because of traffic, I was pinned in behind her for 3 miles or so. I think kids ought to be sent to a cell and text free zone for at least a year. Twas bad enough when they were allowed to use calculators instead of learning how to calculate in their head.
Or force them to use radios with tubes in them. Real radios glow in the dark anyway.
Sir Charles THE Curmudgeon
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On Sat, 28 Mar 2009 10:35:15 -0500, "CharlesTheCurmudgeon"

That's not necessarily true, particular on the interstate. Indiana studied that question and found that when the speed limit was raised on the interstates the severity of accidents did not increase.
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wrote:

Multi-car accidents, or the ones involving just one vehicle?
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On Sun, 29 Mar 2009 09:30:50 -0400, "JoeSpareBedroom"

They studied all types of accidents. 52.9% were two car, 12.1% were more then 2 car. 31.1% were single vehicle. Speed was identified as the primary cause in only 5.78% of them.
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And in what percent was it a primary or contributing cause?
Jeff
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wrote:

Umm, 5.78% ???
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wrote:

I don't buy that for a minute. Part of "speed" is "slow down." I've caused 2 accidents - many years ago. One was pure speed, going around a curve the car couldn't handle. The other was not slowing down in slick conditions, and choosing to stay too close to the guy in front of me, who stopped for a yellow, and I slid into him. Too fast for conditions. Speed. So it's been 100% speed for me. Since I've slowed down, I haven't even come close. But since it's only been 35 years since the last accident, maybe that's not enough time to tell.
--Vic
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You are now approaching the age where falling asleep is more of a danger.
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On Sun, 29 Mar 2009 12:22:20 -0600, Vic Smith

I'm sure your single data point is more valid then a study of hundreds of accidents.
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Interstate highways are designed for higher speed travel and raising the speed limit 5 mph may not be that significant compared to other factors such as weather.
That same study says: "For example, as shown in Table 2, for rural-county-road accidents involving a car or light truck with a heavy truck, a 1% increase in the speed limits results in a 2.77% increase in the probability of fatality and a 2.35% increase in the probability of injury. For rural-state-route accidents involving a car or light truck with another car or light truck, a 1% increase in the speed limit results in a 11.9% increase in the probability of fatality and a 1.32% increase in the probability of injury. The accident-injury severity findings on non-interstate highways suggest that extreme caution needs to be exercised when raising the speed limits on these roads."
-- Ron
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