Re: Fuel tank rust perforation.



I learned years ago that moisture and on metal causes rust.
So you need to clean it ALL (rust) off with a wire brush or such, scuff rest of it with sand paper, and put a two-part zinc primer on it, then paint it with automotive enamel. And try to keep it free of mud and stuff afterward.
Trying to isolate it from ground won't help, if you could suspend a metal plate in the air in the eastern or southern parts of the US, it would still rust.
Anybody living in these areas of the country and needing a used fuel tank might do well to get one from a wrecking yard in Vegas or Phoenix, not much rust on cars here, and I never heard of anybody replacing a fuel tank due to rust.
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I agree with most of your comments. Moisture is the culprit, whether the rust is internal or external.
If I had the clean tank out of the car, I might use a good grade of undercoat rather than paint.
If the rust is internal, then then the situation is complicated. I just had my John Deere tank turn to lace because the diesel was contaminated with water. My fault for letting it go so long. I took it out and had the tank soldered. Postponed spending several hundred bucks, and if i keep the water out of it, it will last a long time... If I dont, then $$$ wasted
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