honda accord oil leak

Hi. I have 1992 Honda Accord LX. I just noticed that engine oil leaks a little. I took it to my mechanic and he told me that it might be a either minor or major problem. In order to make sure, he has to take it
apart a little. So I just told him that I will be back and drove it home without doing any work on it. Do you think I can just keep checking the oil level every week and add if it is a little low without damaging the engine?
Thank you in advance.
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This would be a good time to clean or replace the PCV valve, though, on general principles. A plugged PCV valve will pressurize the crankcase with blow-by and force oil out where it wouldn't normally leak. And the mechanic should have been able to get a good idea where the leak is coming from (or at least narrow the range of possibilities) with just a visual inspection. It makes me wonder if the leak is under the timing belt cover, a place that does require some disassembly to look at... in which case there is a risk of timing belt damage and eventual failure if oil gets on the belt. That is something you don't want to happen.
Mike Mike
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That happens when there's excessive blowby, and when the crankcase breather hose is either plugged or unable to cope with the blowby.
The mechanic should be able to determine this quickly and easily by removing the oil filler cap with the engine running. He can also unplug the breather hose at one end and check it for sludge and oil, which is also a quick check.
He can pinch the PCV hose and see if the idle changes. If it does not, the PCV valve is plugged, and the above problems become more likely.

If the leak is bad enough had has been going on for some time, wind whipping around the engine bay will have fouled everything, making the leak source hard to discover.
However, if it's the rear main seal, dripping should be apparent from the vent hole (if so equipped) at the bottom of the transmission bellhousing.
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known leakage from a rear main seal to get into the clutch? The flywheel is in the way, but I've wondered about oil being flung by the flywheel and dripping into the clutch.
Mike
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Had it happen on a '75 Corolla. The clutch was not affected.
However, I was told that if I let it go long enough, it would have eventually been flung onto the upper portion of the bellhousing, and it would have dripped on to the clutch from there. Apparently it has to be quite bad, and be left quite a long time, before that has a danger of happening.
A crank/cam seal leakage is simliar. Automakers recognize the damage a leaking seal can cause, so they go to some lengths to protect the timing belt and clutch from the leakage.
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come on at last.
Mike
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Remember how the gas companies used to give free gifts with fillups? (plates, glasses, car washes, etc) If your leak so bad that you are getting gifts from where you buy oil, you probably have a bad oil problem :)
Just kidding but - everything being relative - how much oil does it lose? Does it drop (do you see droplets under the car after it sat overnight) or get burned? How many miles do you travel to add what kind of quantity of oil?
You could replace the PVC valve (in case of burning), which is a very inexpensive DIY fix, if that is your problem. Not sure how easy the head gasket and pan gaskets are to replace on a Accort - that could also be your problem.
If you have to add a little to keep it topped off once a week, it is not a big deal. It is a 92 so one would assume you have decent number of miles on it. It is pretty much expected on an older car. Putting some oil in the car is most likely a lot cheaper than getting it fixed by your mechanic, even in the long run.
I drove a 72 Volvo for years just topping off with a little oil once a week. Unless you are getting gifts from your oil supplier, It may not be much of a problem.
Remco
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.earthlink wrote:

I seem to recall that another person had this same problem about 3 weeks ago. I'll suggest to you the same thing that I suggested to him. Visit a shipping store and buy a large cardboard box. Cut it to that it is flat. Check the weather forcast. If there is no rain expected for the next couple of days, place the cardboard under your car before you go to bed. When you get up the following morning, leave the cardboard in place. Use a flashlite to determine if there is any oil on the cardboard. If you see oil on the cardboard--use the flashlite to attempt to determine where the oil is leaking from. Re-post and tell us the results. I had to do this same thing several years ago. I should note that for several days after an oil change--it's normal to find leaking oil--it's nothing to worry about.
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