Lug nut Torque - 06 Civic Si

Just wanted to double-check this. I have never tightened the lug nuts on tires using any method other than "as tight as you can get them",
using either a wrench or an impact gun. Since I am worried about the potential of warping the rotors, I bought a torque wrench and today I replaced the wheels on my 06 Civic Si.
The specs I found said 80 ft/lbs. This is what I did. It really doesn't seem all that tight, though. Is this the right torque, or was I mislead? Last thing I want is a wheel coming off at speed, and I DO like to drive hard... ;-)
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On Fri, 24 Apr 2009 03:54:15 -0500, Joe

Lug nuts have no bearing at all on rotors. Torque for lug nuts is for 1. Safety 2. Alloy rims and safety
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I am pretty sure you are wrong on this. I have read many reports, as well as talked to several mechanics, who have stated that over-torque on lug nuts on single thickness (non-ventilated) rotors will cause warping.
I am no expert, by far, but I have already seen a difference. The front wheels were making noise when torqued up, and the noise has disappeared at 80 ft/lbs.
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Joe wrote:

indeed.
not permanent warping, but elastic distortion that makes the brakes shudder. if you take the disk off, you can see how skinny the honda hub is. it's strong enough for the job, but has no excess weight, therefore no excess stiffness. easy to elastically distort under uneven lug nut loading.

that's usual.
with alloys though, you need to re-torque them after a few miles from re-fitting. they tend to move about on the hub a little and the lug nuts loosen. after that, they're fine.
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Clete wrote:

Hi, No bearing on rotor? If you tighten it too mcuh you can warp the rotor (specially the non cast iron rotor; punched one)
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It is the correct torque. 80 ft-lbs puts a LOT of clamping force on the wheel.
Too many clueless people seem to think the "correct" torque is the figure where they need to jump on the ratchet to achieve it.

At 80 ft-lbs you will have no problems with wheels coming loose. Nor will you have problems with studs snapping off.
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Thanks Teg. It just FEELS to light... ;-)

It's the way most of us were taught by Dad... ;-)

Exactly what I needed. As always, appreciate the good info.
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That's why people break fasteners (I'll turn the wrench juuuust a little more...).
You need to learn the "feel" that comes with approaching correct torque. There's a sudden ramp-up in turning effort that is your clue.

My dad was a mechanical engineer. I still have his old beam-type torque wrench.

You're welcome.
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Still have mine.. was using it back in the 60s when I bought it at Sears.

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Dad's old beam-type is the "DURO" brand, No. 8099 (no I'm not kidding; there really is a one-half symbol in there), made by Duro Metal Products of Chicago. The unit calls itself a "Tension Indicator". Reads up to 100 ft lbs.
Here it is: <
http://www.tegger.com/hondafaq/misc/torque_wrench_comparing_2.jpg
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Tegger wrote:

how did they compare?
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It was weird.
The Duro read a max of about 10% off either way from the clicker setting when the clicker clicked. The clicker's advertised tolerance is 4% up or down. I figured something had to be wrong with my setup, but I can't figure out what that might have been. The barrel of the clicker was NOT distorted at all by the vise. I checked with a mike.
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On 4/24/09 3:54 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@barada.griffincs.local,

80 ft/lbs has been the correct torque for Honda wheels for as long as I can remember.
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Hey, this is my first Honda. While I've had it since new, I've never changed a tire on it before...
Hell, this is my first car with alloy wheels... ;-)
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