Re: NEVER BUY WALMART'S BATTERIES OR YOU WILL BE SORRY

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Another goofy OT post from one of our lefty kook friends ROTFLOL


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We heard you the first time!
--
Paul Hoffman
Burlington ON
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If everybody did that perhaps of our lefty kook friends would take their goofy OT post to another NG.
mike

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Another goofy post from one of our lefty kook friends ROTFLOL
mike

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"Geoff Miller" ..

*snipping funny Twitney signature*
But I think he (she?) means looking for potholes, rocks, etc.
Face it - you're very vulnerable on a two-wheeled vehicle of any kind.
Natalie
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On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 19:40:13 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@lava.net (Geoff Miller) wrote:

I guess you don't bike much. Not only are things like potholes and loose gravel of great importance, the pavement where bikes get to ride tends to be less well maintained than normal traffic lanes.
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: Huh? The road pavement isn't going to move. The door on one of : those parked cars just might.

I've been biking since JFK was in the White House. You?

The point isn't that things like potholes and loose gravel aren't of great importance. It's that given the relatively low speeds of bicycles and how visible the road is to a cyclist, they're suffic- iently easy to spot from a moderate distance, prior to actually arriving at them, that one's attention can easily and safely be diverted to other things for brief but sufficient intervals. Such as, say, to cars parked along the side of the road, and to whether there's anyone sitting in them who might suddenly open a door in front of one without looking first, for example.
As for "the pavement where bikes get to ride," in this context we're talking about the potential hazard of car doors being opened in front of you. In order for car doors to be a concern, you'd obviously have to be riding to the left of cars parked at the curb -- which would place you in the normal traffic lane. Near the right edge of it, granted, but in the normal traffic lane nonetheless. You wouldn't be riding close to the right edge of the pavement, where the asphalt abuts the concrete gutter or the shoulder, which is the part that "tends to be less well maintained than normal traffic lanes."
You exhibit a tendency that I've noticed is common among bicyclists. Well, two of them, actually, the first being unnecessary snottiness ("I guess you don't bike much."). The other is an inclination to place all blame and responsibility for your safety onto the shoulders of motorists and onto physical road conditions -- the obvious intent being that you won't have to change your habits by, say, developing better situational awareness and by riding off to the side of the road where you'd be both safer and out from underfoot.
Geoff
-- "Wit goes for the jugular, not the jocular." -- Florence King
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writes:

*snipping for brevity*
You exhibit a tendency that I've noticed is common among bicyclists. Well, two of them, actually, the first being unnecessary snottiness ("I guess you don't bike much."). The other is an inclination to place all blame and responsibility for your safety onto the shoulders of motorists and onto physical road conditions -- the obvious intent being that you won't have to change your habits by, say, developing better situational awareness and by riding off to the side of the road where you'd be both safer and out from underfoot.
Geoff
You made my point very well. I'm saying that being on a two-wheeled vehicle greatly increases your risk for severe injury - period. Whose fault the accident was is irrelevant, because the car driver will probably survive, but you will be street pizza.
Natalie
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One, there's riding and there's riding. A kid pedaling his bike around suburbia isn't in anywhere near the danger that an urban bicycle messenger or an agressive Effective Cyclist/Critical Masshole type places himself into, either by his style of riding or by the sort of environment in which he does it.
Two, even if we accept for the sake of argument that a bicyclist is at increased risk of serious injury, that doesn't necessarily bring that risk from the realm of "possible" into that of "likely"; nor does it make head injuries any more likely than any other sort -- which is what you and I disagreed about in the first place.
Geoff
-- "Wit goes for the jugular, not the jocular." -- Florence King
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"Geoff Miller" ...

And we still disagree. I think it's madness not to wear a helmet if you're on a 2-wheeled vehicle.
So there we are.
Natalie
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On Tue, 23 Oct 2007 14:50:26 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@lava.net (Geoff Miller) wrote:

Me too! Well, not exactly, I did bike when JFK was in the White House but after two bikes got stolen at college I gave it up for many years. It wasn't until I noticed that virtually every male on my mother's side of the family died of heart disease before they were 55 that I take it up again. Of course, they were southern boys who ate lots of fried food, smoked constantly, and got no exercise.
So I started biking again. After six months I had a physical and my HDL was way up, LDL and Trig way down. My doctor was amazed. So, for all the risk of biking as a means of commuting (it really isn't very dangerous at all), for me it makes sense. Of course, I could do the same thing in the gym but I don't. I have to commute, and if I bike it takes 1:20, and if I take the bus and train it takes 1:20. And I don't have to go to the gym.

This is true, but as you know, the eyes are constantly in motion when biking. I do watch the pavement, plus the driveways, pedestrians, cover plates (slippery when wet), and such. And I watch for and avoided many opening doors.

I'm thinking of a couple of roads on my commute which are pretty badly paved near the parked cars. I do watch that every time I ride it. It is also a street where folks tend to open doors without looking and people drive aggressively.

Was that snotty? I didn't mean it to be. You also might not ride in the places I do, where roads are bad enough to be worthy of closer vigilance. I'm not talking about an occasional pothole, I'm talking about an occasional smooth area.
I also don't place blame on anyone else unless it is deserved. Most of the drivers and pedestrians I encounter are considerate and aware of their surroundings. Even the cabbies. Their passengers are a big hazzard though. They fling doors open on my left side. I was driving once and a cab passenger opened the door into my car.
I'm far from what you might consider a typical biker. I don't care about my cadence so I slow down in situations that call for it. I don't wear tight lycra, but do wear bright and reflective clothes.
I do have to put up with our over-motored society where anything that interferes with blasting down the road as fast as possible is to be driven out from "underfoot". That was an interesting word for someone who claims to be a biker.

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In that case, I apologize.

Cycling is something I do, not something I define myself in terms of. That's a fundamental difference between most drivers and most adult bicyclists, and it's part of what forms the attitude that many cyclists have toward drivers.
"Out from underfoot" was an apt choice of phrase considering that many "serious" cyclists are inconsiderate at best, and that many actively enjoy obstructing traffic. Their ride of choice is non-polluting, you see, and that makes them morally superior. Or so they seem to believe.
These people demand to be taken seriously as legitimate vehicle operators and given the same respect as drivers, and yet they're often irresponsible about getting in other people's way and often only obey traffic laws when it's convenient for them to do so.
It's rare that I see a cyclist actually stop at a stop sign, for example. Yes, motorists have been known to run stop signs, too -- but it's the exception, not the rule. And more to the point, it isn't motorists who are the ones demanding rights while willfully (and childishly) ignoring the attendant responsibilities.
Geoff
-- "Wit goes for the jugular, not the jocular." -- Florence King
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On Fri, 26 Oct 2007 13:22:33 -0000, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"
...

Actually I'm considerate but choose to use laws when it suits me. Those aren't mutally exclusive.
I run lights much of the time. As it is, it takes me 1:20 to get from home to work. Since the lights are timed for cars and not me, it would take seriously more time if I stopped and waited at lights where there is no one else around. I usually leave home well before 6:30 AM.
Many bike advocates say that bikes should have the same rights and reponsibilities as cars. Nonsense. We aren't cars. We can't go as fast and can't do the damage. We also aren't pedestrians, who cross streets in ways that make me gasp sometimes. I do it. Are you saying that all people should wait for the green light? Of course they should, but that isn't reality.
No, I'm a bike. I look before running lights, both ways even though virtually all the lights I run are on one way streets. Here in NYC I hardly ever see a bike wait for a light where they didn't have to. I do sometimes see people waiting at a light. There is a name for that kind of person. They're called tourists.
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You can call them alive, too.....
--
Scott in Florida





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On Tue, 30 Oct 2007 12:41:13 GMT, Scott in Florida

Well, yes I suppose so. Of course, the rest of us are alive also.
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In most eastern states bike riders are subject to the same rules of the road as motor vehicles.. One can even be charged with DUI. In my opinion the bikes and the riders should be licensed, as well, to help pay the road use taxes that are used to set up and maintain bike lanes. LOL
mike
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Mike Hunter wrote:

Cyclists should also be INSURED, as many of them don't have a pot to piss in when it comes to paying for damage to the car doors they slam into.

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Gee, every place I've ever seen, if you don't look before opening your car door and somebody hits it, you're at fault. But I suppose you live somewhere where bikes go faster than the speed of light.
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There's no "LOL" about it. It makes perfect sense.
Many bicyclists are fond of claiming equal rights to the road on the basis that they're also drivers, and so pay all the taxes that are relevant to driving.
Well, if they're so honest and up-front about recognizing the social value of taxation, then surely they wouldn't object to paying this additional, dedicated tax on bicycles. I say sign 'em up!
Geoff
-- "Have you ever noticed that whenever you sneeze on your dashboard or computer monitor, it smells like pussy?" -- bandy
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dgk wrote:

Only LIEbrawls/DEMONrats sneer at the law as you do. Here, in Alberta, Canada, cyclists have most of the rights AND responsibilities of motorists. You bike through a red light, YOU tell it to the judge.
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