2007 Tuscon Mileage

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Anyone having any issues with the mileage ?
I just bought a 2007 Tucson 4wd 2.7L and started with around 13 mpg. I just drove from new York to Chicago round trip plus some side trips
and it went up to 18 mpg. Total mileage 2500. 2000 of which is interstate highways.
I'm home 1 day now and driving around town it's already down to 17.9.
I called the dealer and I'll be bringing it in this week, but the salesman started with the " break-in period" . When I questioned how long till I see the rated 28 or so highway, he didn't know.
Thanks
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wrote:

It's only rated at 19/24 by the EPA. It would take very carefull driving to match that.
This is why I'm so pissed about them dropping the hatchback Elantra. The Tuscon uses the same running gear but the body style has so much more wind drag the milage takes a severe hit.
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> GUEST wrote: > Anyone having any issues with the mileage ? > > I just bought a 2007 Tucson 4wd 2.7L and started with around 13 mpg. I > just drove from new York to Chicago round trip plus some side trips > and it went up to 18 mpg. Total mileage 2500. 2000 of which is interstate > highways. > > I'm home 1 day now and driving around town it's already down to 17.9. > > I called the dealer and I'll be bringing it in this week, but the > salesman started with the " break-in period" . When I questioned how long > till I see the rated 28 or so highway, he didn't know. > > Thanks
I do not understand why people buy SUVs. They are not economy cars. If you want gas milage, get a Prius.
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I echo southluke's response. Why cry about mileage when you buy an SUV? Look around the roads and imagine how much less fuel we would use if the SUV's of all sizes were off the road.

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Snow. Many SUVs are good in snow because of 4WD or AWD. Econo cars with tiny tires are not.

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Back in the 'old days', I drove a VW beetle through some major snowstorms in NE Pa and never got stuck, so the argument of large is better in snow isn't always true. Driving in snow is more a function of the skills of the driver and familiarity with his car's reaction in snow.

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The only time, IMO, that a 4x4 or truck is better in the snow is when it is deep on the road. I think the last time I needed 4 wheel drive was the blizzard of 1996 here in NJ, when we had 32-36" of snow in 36 hours (and drifts to 7'). It snowed so fast and hard that the plows just gave up. Since I work for a utility, I had to come in to work, albeit for an hour or so. I remember driving through Princeton in my 1984 GMC 4x4 (it was the small truck). The snow was so deep that I was plowing it with the front of my hood.
Other than that type of situation, I can't imagine needing 4 wheel drive in the snow. Unless you lived in an area that didn't get plowed or you plow yourself.
And the other poster was 100% on when they said about the SUV's usually being the one in the ditch during a small snow storm. People don't seem to learn much driving skill any more. The funny thing to me is that it really doesn't take that much to learn how to really drive.
Eric
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I got stuck in the Philly airport during that blizzard! What a mess....

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I read two examples in this thread, of memories/examples of cars that didn't get stuck in snow...a Beetle and a Corvair. OK I'll give ya that, but that was over thirty year ago boys, if you are going to give me examples of cars that don't get stuck in snow, then try and keep it in this decade. And Ed said "4WD is better in deep snow, but on a plowed highway, good tires and good driving skills are the better choice." On a plowed highway? That would mean no snow, right? I guess I might have to agree with that, if your premise for the "better choice" is better economy, but I guess I will have to sit at home until the roads are plowed..
If given the choice; I would rather have a Tucson, or Forester, etc over a two wheel drive car because of the increased traction.

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A "plowed road" will still have some snow cover, generally in the 1 to 3 inch range.
OK, recent cars that don't get stuck in the snow: 1. Every car I've owned since my 1962 Corvair.
I have never been stuck in snow less than about 4" or so with a 2WD sedan. Fact is, the plows keep the roads in good shape around here so it is unusual to see more than that except under extreme circumstances.
If you live on a farm, five miles from the nearest paved road, you may have some troubles. I live in northeast Connecticut and we get from 48 to 96 inches of snowfall a year. I've yet to be able to drive on any road at any time in the 26 years I've been in this area.
Things may be different where you live, but for most of the northeast portion of the country, and most populous areas in the snowbelt, the need for 4WD is minimal given the response of the snow removal equipment around today. I remember putting chains on cars 40+ years ago but I don't even see them sold around here any more.
If you live on top of a mountain, get the 4WD. If you are in an urban or suburban areas, you'd be hard pressed to truly justify the need. Most of the idiots you see on the evening news are sliding on ice or driving too fast for conditions and no amount of driven wheels would help them get control and stop when needed.
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After a heavy snowstorm our ancient AMC Eagle 4WD wagon is the only thing we have that can navigate our long driveway until it is plowed out. (With all wheels driven and good ground clearance, the Eagle charges right through deep snow.)
When new-car shopping we considered a Tuscon but were concerned with the reports of very poor gas mileage, especially with V6 and 4WD. (In fact by some accounts, the Tuscon actually gets a little worse mileage in actual use than our decades-old Eagle with its emissions-strangled, carbureted inline six and old-style 3-speed automatic!) While the Sonata is not an economy car, the mileage is quite acceptable for a vehicle of its type; we get about 22 mpg around town and just shy of 30 mpg on long trips.
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In theory, you may have a point, but we get a fair amount of snow here and I see more SUV's in the ditch than plain old sedans. Could partly be the superiority attitude of the SUV driver that thinks his high center of gravity vehicle is invincible. 4WD is better in deep snow, but on a plowed highway, good tires and good driving skills are the better choice.
Best car I ever had for snow was a Corvair with 13" wheels.
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I have an '03 Tib and have taken that thru some pretty bad snow storms and it has always felt more sure footed in the snow that my last car an '92 Accord coupe (even when it was new). I would like something with a little more ground clearance for snow weather since the neighborhood roads out to the secondary do not always get plowed in a timely fashion, not to mention the 18" of show and ice that accumulates in the intersection. ;-)
I know I got hung up on it last year.....
So a second vehicle such as a SUV would have its advantages.

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LOL you will never see 28 mpg.
Motor week tested one and out of all the like sport cutes the TUSCON had the worst MPG avg. around 19 mpg.
get used to filling her up.

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My V6 FWD get 22 city & 32 Hwy. I use Marathon gas to get this great mileage, as BP puts me at 17 city 26 hwy. I live on Cruise Control too..........
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As much of the groups has posted, no way. However, cruise control and a K & N filter allows my 06 Sonata LX to near if not go over the EPA stated mileage. I pulled 31.7 the other day on a required trip to my Corporate HQ in Las Vegas. I've seen 32 on my trips to Tucson, AZ
Steve, AZ

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The K&N filters do help airflow but beware of overoiling the filter when you clean it. The oil vapors will destroy your mass airflow sensor. Also, It really shouldn't impact fuel economy because the fuel/air mixture is set by the computer. If air flows in more easily through your filter, the computer will still adjust to the same mixture. The K&N's are great for older cars before computers but do nothing for newer models, IMHO. Tom

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Tom wrote:

Fuel economy isn't just a function if air/fuel ratio. It is also a function of pumping loss. Pulling air past a restriction requires energy and the energy comes from the fuel. A less restrictive intake and/or exhaust will reduce pumping loss and in theory will increase fuel efficiency. However, the restriction from a paper element filter is extremely low to start with so the K&N advantage is very small. I'd be very surprised if the difference in fuel economy is enough to even detect without very sophisticated instrumentation. A K&N may flow better when heavily loaded than will a paper element filter, but very few street vehicles will clog a paper filter in even 50,000 miles. I still have the original air filter on my 2003 Dodge minivan at 85,000 miles and it is barely dirty. Unless you drive off-road or on a lot of dirt roads behind other vehicles, you simply don't pick up much dust.
Old cars had the intake inside the engine compartment behind the front wheels and the turbulence in the engine compartment from normal airflow and the big old metal fans would stir a lot of road dust up around the engine where the intake snorkle would pick it up. Virtually all modern vehicles have the air intake up high behind the grill with a plastic duct carrying the air to the air filter and then the fuel injector. Even on a dirt road, you don't get dust into the top of the grill unless you are driving behind another vehicle or passing a steady stream of vehicles going the other direction. This is very different from the "old days" when the engine compartment intake would pick up dust from your own vehicle, not just other vehicles.
Matt
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You're right, Matt. The computer can only vary the injector timing to a certain % so if the filter is really clogged, you'll end up with a rich mixture. You can see this quite easily if you are behind a diesel car that has been neglected and not had it's air filter changed. It'll smoke like it's at a tractor pull. :o)
Tom

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Why does the oil filter matter so much ?
Also, I'm considering taking the loss ad trading it in for a Jeep Patriot. Any comments ??
Thanks

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