DIY brake pad replacement in Elantra disc brakes

Time for at least new pads. Can it be safe and effective to just replace the pads? I would think it depends on whether or not the rotors are true
and sufficiently smooth, but is that something I can assess beyond noting that there is no vibration or pulsation when the brakes are applied? I cannot trust that any shop is going to support this instead of pushing a complete brake job, so I would appreciate disinterested opinions.
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I've done that often, but in some cases, the caliper may need some work too. Be sure they are working freely.
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| Time for at least new pads. Can it be safe and effective to just replace | the pads? I would think it depends on whether or not the rotors are true | and sufficiently smooth, but is that something I can assess beyond noting | that there is no vibration or pulsation when the brakes are applied? I | cannot trust that any shop is going to support this instead of pushing a | complete brake job, so I would appreciate disinterested opinions. | While you may be able to do it if the rotors are in good shape and not scored or warped or badly worn (check for lip on outer edge), rotors are likely only $50 a pop depending on your year so you might consider replacing them as well.
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If you've got no vibration/pulsation, then you've already determined you shouldn't have any issues with this when the pads are replaced.
You'll also need to inspect the rotors to determine whether the braking surface is uneven or has rust on it. You should be able to do this simply by pulling the wheels and looking at the rotors to check for rust or grooves on the parts contacted by the pads.
If you've got no rust/grooves on the braking surface and no vibration, I recommend not resurfacing the rotors. In this case, resurfacing simply shortens the life of the rotors-- they're thinner and less able to properly dissipate heat, and you'll have less room to resurface later if needed.
For best results, use the same brake pad that is currently installed. This maximizes the chances that it'll fit exactly in the braking surface currently worn on the rotor.
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On Sun, 13 Sep 2009 19:16:35 -0700 (PDT), hyundaitech

Just to add my 2 worth;
Many of the pads today (actually most of them) are metallic. They actually wear the rotors thickness down. Just changing the pads is fine, but you really should measure the rotors to make sure they're not too thin. Putting pads on undersized rotors can be very dangerous. they could cause the rotors to actually shatter when you hit the brakes hard. I've seen this happen and ever since then, I always measure the rotors before just putting new pads on. There are specs for different cars/rotors, find out the minimum thickness of your rotors.
The other advice is spot on, make sure the calipers are working freely.
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On Mon, 14 Sep 2009 15:10:04 -0400, Brian Matthews

and don't forget to file the pad notches so the pads move freely. ;-)
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