270 CDI 2002; Turbo opinion (UK)

Hi Would you guys comment? I've been told by an experienced user that one should always leave the car running for 2 minutes prior to driving and before switching off..
He said that mercedes dealerships deny it but this prolongs the life of the turbo in diesel cars.
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Unnecessary although it won't "hurt" the diesel turbo to do so, but it's your fuel that's being wasted.
One consideration after fast driving, for any engine, especially gas powered turbo engines, is to let the motor idle for a few minutes prior to shut down to avoid "coking" the lube oil inside the hot turbo. Diesel exhaust is about 75% the temperature of a gas engine so there's less thermal stress on its turbo vs. a turbo on a gasoline engine.
Turbo failure on M-B diesels is very rare; the turbo typically lasts an engine's overhaul life.
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On Aug 27, 4:29 pm, "-->> T.G. Lambach <<--" <"T.G. Lambach at NoHamorSpamcomcast.net"> wrote:

That's what I was thinking too. I don't see letting it idle before shutting it off after normal driving doing anything. If it was driving where there was a lot of load on the engine, ie high speed, uphill, etc, then allowing the turbo temp to come down can avoid coking. In most cases, that is achieved via some normal driving for 5 mins. If you were faced with immediate shutdown after a period of heavy load, then a few minutes of idling to let temps normalize can avoid coking of the oil in turbos.
As far as normal startup, most of the sources I've seen that I consider credible say that you don't need to do anything special. I just get mine started, wait maybe 5 or 10 secs for oil pressure to build, then drive off and take it easy for the first couple miles until it warms up. If it were extremely cold, I would let it idle a bit, using a slightly higher idle to keep it running smoother, before driving off.

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That's sound advice for all cars, incl non-turbo, especially the bit about taking it easy until [the engine] warms up.
DAS
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Thanks for all of that - what about the issue of that you should ensure that there is no lube starvation in the turbo bearing when you next start up.
Sam

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It's common for MB diesels to go 300K+ miles without doing anything special. You don't want oil starvation at any bearing, but that has been taken care of by the designers to the extent possible. There isn't anything you're going to do about it. Stop worrying and enjoy the car.
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Your opinions are valuable and your main point is excellent. Many thanks to you all
wrote:

It's common for MB diesels to go 300K+ miles without doing anything special. You don't want oil starvation at any bearing, but that has been taken care of by the designers to the extent possible. There isn't anything you're going to do about it. Stop worrying and enjoy the car.
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