Rear wheel alignment

Tiger, tried that trick of dropping a plumb bob down from each of the jack points to see if the frame was out of alignment on my '81 240D. The diagional dimensions were only about 1/8-inch different so the frame is
obviously okay. I still think that somehow those two rear wheel bearing carriers got twisted to the right. However, it's puzzling that they are both aimed toward the right and both about the same angle. If you have no other suggestions I might just consider dropping the rear sub frame assembly out and put another one in from a wrecking yard. The other alternative would be to make a jig that would mount solidly on the hub with a long lever attached and bend the unit back straight. I'm not sure just what sort of stress that would put on the bearing itself but it sure isn't right the way it sits now.
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Wow... straight frame and axle twisting toward the right? Do you know anyone in Body Shop business? If you do, have them give you some advice what may happened... I know the body shop can twist it back true for you... You really needs heavy duty hydraulic ram to straighten it out.
I can only think of possibility that someone drove the car into the curb... that kinda knocks the wheel off at an angle... more like someone drove too fast backward at an angle so the end result was twist to the right.
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I agree Tiger. Still puzzling how both wheels are out about the same! Tks for advice. Will try to see what can be done. Was told by people at MB that only solution was to replace the carriers. That's more than the car's worth despite only 117k miles.

anyone
curb...
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Are you sure of the 117K miles? What did Carfax tells you? I would take it to a body shop and see what they say.
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You can never be sure of anything these days, Tiger. However, the car is in the best shape I've ever seen a 240D of this vintage with the exception of the rear wheel alignment. I did replace the clutch, pressure plate, TO bearing and I do change the oil, filter, fuel filter every 2,500 miles. It doesn't use a drop of oil but I did have to replace the radiator (aftermarket for $152!) which I'm sure has more to do with time rather than total miles driven. I RTV'd the valve cover to rid myself of a small oil leak (only one located so far). I really like this car and it starts as quickly as a gas engine and has lots of pep (for a diesel). Incidentally, the vacuum system apparently has some minor leaks and I'm wondering if that's more a consideration of the age of the vacuum diaphram operators throughout the car? Any good way to systematically run down these problems. I saw a "manual" advertised on eBay by a fellow who has several different "manuals" available for MB but don't know if that's the smart way to go. Any suggestions?

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I have the MB manual for your W123... Rubber ages so eventually they must be replaced. As for the rubber diaphragms... mityvac is the only way to test them... just be careful not to exert too much vacuum... you want to see if it holds the vacuum well.
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I have the factory manuals for the W123. I'm just wondering if there is a simpler 1, 2, 3, etc. process that walks one through the process? I can probably use the manual itself and do the trouble shooting but was wondering if there is a simple way to isolate certain sections of the system. Any help appreciated. Incidentally, thanks a million Tiger for your help on that frame check. It worked great and was simple to do. As an engineer I should have thought of that early on.

be
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Any idea of best internet site to obtain a new, front, lower control arm, inner rubber bushing? Also, do I need any radical special tools or can installation be made using clamps, vice, etc.?

be
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My main source for parts is now:
http://www.mr-auto-parts.com /
The best prices I seen on internet and great service. Lower control arm... means springs must be compressed... means you need internal spring compressor... you can rent a set from Performance Products.
I have wrote extensively about spring compressor so you should check the archive. This job is dangerous and you need the proper INTERNAL spring compressor. (Do NOT use strut spring compressors)
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I have a pretty extensive machine shop in my garage. Is this something that's terribly difficult to make? I've seen the pics in my service manual and it looks like a 5/8 to 3/4 full thread rod with proper ends might do the same job. Any idea why this might be too dangerous? Also, any idea what it might cost to rent a spring compressor from Performance Products? As you can tell I try to reduce the outlay if possible.

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I have used that spring compressor from Performance Products... the tool is made by Sir Tool... For some reason, the one I got... even though was new... was defective... too much play in the thread that it slips past each other... releasing the spring tension.... and yes I was injured...
The good thing is that I wasn't injured badly as it could have been. You can use domestic internal spring compressor but you will need to add spacer as the threaded rod is too long.
This equipment is super heavy duty so it is not something common folks can make themself... maybe you can. All you have to understand is how much tension force that the spring will hold when compressed... and that is quite alot.
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According to my manual you should compress the spring with the weight of the car resting on the wheel on top of a jack. That would help compress the spring a little and, hopefully, when the wheel is lowered the spring would remain compressed and removal made much easier. Am I missing something?

is
new...
can
quite
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Using the car's weight to compress the spring for you makes the job a little bit easier... but alot more hassle...
For example... first you need to be able to access the spring so you can set the spring compressor in there... a pain in the ass with the wheel in place... then lower the car to compress the spring and then tighten up the spring compressor... then you got to jack up the car... take the wheel off so you can take the spring out... need I go on?
You can save yourself a step of two with a safety jack on the lower control arm instead of wheel installed...
Logistical problem... you'll see when you start to work on it...
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Thanks Tiger. Incidentally, found the lower control arm bushing kit at Drivewire on the internet for $23.54 including tax! Bought some fuel filters to get the total over $50 for free shipping. I'm in S. Calif and the filters arrived the next day. However, the kit was out of stock but (hopefully) coming. Will let you know how the installation goes.

little
set
control
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