Ford's New V8 Going To Rock You Like A Hurricane!

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The Hurricane is back.
A year after Ford Motor Co. killed its planned Hemi-fighting V-8 to the dismay of horsepower junkies, Ford Americas group chief Mark Fields has
put the high-performance engine back in the company's product pipeline, according to sources familiar with the project.
Fields revived the engine three months ago as part of a new restructuring plan for the automaker. The decision offers a telling insight into how serious Fields is about shaking things up at Ford, underscoring his repeated assertions that nothing is off the table when it comes to reshaping the automaker's troubled North American auto operations, which lost $1.6 billion last year.
Ford nixed the Hurricane project because of concerns about development costs and rising gasoline prices. Now, Fields has decided that maintaining Ford's leadership in the pickup truck market against mounting challenges from rivals General Motors Corp. and DaimlerChrysler AG's Chrysler Group trumps those concerns.
Many analysts were dismayed by Ford's decision to halt development of the Hurricane, which will likely get a new name before hitting the market.
"It was a dumb program to kill," said Jim Hall, an analyst with AutoPacific in Southfield. Hall said Ford got spooked by soaring fuel prices last spring, which seemed to spell bad news for thirsty high-horsepower engines. However, he said long-term analysis shows that, while demand for big engines may ebb and flow as a result of gasoline prices or other factors, it remains steady over time.
Erich Merkle, a brand analyst with IRN Inc. in Grand Rapids, is not surprised Ford decided to revive the Hurricane.
"They've got to do something from a powertrain perspective if they're going to hold on to the F-series' lead," he said, noting that both GM and Chrysler have more powerful engines on the market, particularly in their trucks and sport utilities.
"Ford has nothing," Merkle said. "Without those bigger options, they are going to have a hard time competing."
Ford does have some big engines, but none that can compete with the 425-horsepower 6.1-liter Hemi or the 403-horsepower Vortec that will equip the 2007 Cadillac Escalade SUV. With its 300-horsepower Triton, Ford's2007 Lincoln Navigator will have a hard time keeping up with the Escalade.
When it comes to engines, few have captured the public's imagination like Chrysler's Hemi.
The Hemi's roots go back to the 1950s, but the vaunted powerhouse disappeared from production cars in 1974, a victim of new government fuel economy requirements. Chrysler reintroduced a new Hemi in the 2003 Dodge Ram Heavy Duty pickup.
Ford wants theHurricane to more than a match these engines and help ensure the automaker stays on top of the hotly-contested truck segment. As Chrysler has shown with Hemi, however, automakers also can command a price premium for high-performance powertrains. That means the Hurricane could help Ford's bottom line.
Merkle said Ford's Cleveland casting plant has received orders for a new 6.2-liter engine block, with work to begin next year.
"We believe that would be the Hurricane," he said.
However, the Hurricane is not likely to make landfall before 2008. It will probably debut in Ford's F-series pickups. A team has visited Ford's Dearborn Truck factory, where F-150s are made, to assess what changes will be needed to accommodate the new engine on the line there.
But sources say the Hurricane also will be used in other platforms.
NoOp Comment: You can bet one platform will be the Mustang to ensure it matches up with two upcoming pony cars -- i.e. 6.1L Challenger and 6.0L Camaro. Paraphasing a line in the movie Animal House, 'Oh man, this is going to be good!'
While Ford's engine may not incorporate the sort of cylinder deactivation system found in the Hemi and Vortec, sources say it will offer similar fuel economy.
Other approaches that could be used to realize these gains include using the sort of multi-valve systems found on some German engines.
Whatever method Ford employs, the emphasis will remain on horsepower.
Patrick
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If they plan to rename the Hurricane for release, why not simply call it the "Cleveland" or better yet, "Cobra Jet"! Instantly recognizable to those who also recognized the "hemi" moniker
--
John



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John wrote:

Because that would make too much sense. 8-)
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John wrote:

I don't think "Cleveland" would resonate with too many modern buyers, because the name doesn't have a long storied past like the Hemi did. However, in the future, I'll bet a few new Mustang owners refer to their Hurricane's as Clevelands.

Not for the engine name itself, but perhaps for the high-output package.

John,
I think Ford is finally fully in touch with what makes a Mustang a Mustang. I think we'll see a whole slew of novelty Mustangs in the future.
Patrick
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

a) The only hurricanes we'll see soon are ones like we saw last year. Katrina and Wilma to name two.
b) The only thing Ford is in touch with is the fact that they're sinking right along side GM.
c) If we start seeing "novelty" Mustangs, it'll be simply because Ford needs to capitalize on the only decent car they make.
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Joe wrote:
Oh ye, of little faith...
Let's go back 10 years ago. Back then did we think there was a snowball's chance in hell we'd ever see a new:
Bullitt Mustang Mach 1 Supercharged Cobra Mustang, and one putting out 400 HP GT-40 (Ford GT) True retro-style Mustang ('05) 300HP in the standard GT Mustang Shelby Mustang (GT-500)
C'mon, Joe. Give Ford some credit. Yeah, financially they're getting their butt kicked right now, but at least they're fighting back. A lucky us, part of their fight is for us enthusiasts.
Patrick

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I think Joe has it pretty close, Ford makes the special mustangs because it's the only passenger car they make under the ford brand for north america that people actually want to buy.
The Ford GT is a fluke for special connected people with big wallets. I still contend that if Ford was actually serious about it as a production car it would have at least been in the viper/911 price range.
I still think ford would be well served to bring their aussie cars over.
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That Falcon does kick ass!
--
Scott W.
'68 Ranchero 500 302
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As bad as things are for Ford right now they are nowhere near as bad as they were for them in the late 1970s and early 1980s. If they could get out of that mess they should be able to do the same now. Funny because back then one of the first of their models to mark the comeback was the 1979 Mustang. I'm not ready to start eulogizing them just yet.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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wrote:

That fits the theory pretty well... remember how just about everything ended up on the 'fox' platform? Tbird, granada, cougar, mustang, LTD, fairmont, etc...Lots of variants of the car platform that was selling...
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

Frankly, I'm tired of the rhetoric I keep hearing. Ford is like the boy who cried wolf. As I've always said, show me the product. What happened to the Adrenaline and Lightning as a couple of examples? Excuses abound...

call
buyers,
did.
sinking
Ford
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Joe wrote:

Here are my thoughts:
A new Lightening wouldn't have been able to compete with Dodge's Viper truck. The new F150 platform was heavier than the previous design, making it too heavy for the blown undercubed 5.4 to reliably make the necessary horsepower. So instead of playing second fiddle to Dodge in a very small niche market Ford decided to pull out.
I'm also pissed about the Adrenaline. I loved the concept model! That would have been one kick-ass little truck! The only thing I can think of was timing. I think when the decision came to either do it or not do it was about the time gas prices were starting to soar. I think those $2-$3 a gallon prices scared a few execs into playing it safe and wait and see where prices were going to stabilize at.
At least this is what I hope happened. Anyways, if this doesn't soothe it over for you stay positive and imagine a new 6.2 liter Mustang in your driveway. ;-)
Patrick

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

getting
boy
And Ford didn't realize this before they let the cat out of the bag? Either way, it's the SOS - a day late and a dollar short.

That logic holds true for any hipo vehicle, let alone the sport truck. If anything, trucks are more popular than ever.
So why can GM put out something like the Trailblazer SS and Ford stumbles over the Adrenaline faux pas?

I hope you're right, but I'll believe it when I see it. Right now I can wander over to my Dodge dealer and look at a 6.1 liter Charger or Magnum.

the
year.
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Joe wrote:

They kind of got caught with only a having a 5.4 to play with, like they did back in '93 when GM upped the ante with the 275 HP, LT1 powered F-bodies and Ford only had the smaller 302/5-liter available for the Mustang.

Yes, in hindsight the choice was clear.

Yes, that's a good thing... those are neat cars! But just remember Chrysler wasn't doing much of anything for us in the 80s and 90s. At least Ford has carried the performance torch, maybe not brightly all the time, but I have to give them credit for never losing grip of it during those times.
Patrick
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

History is great and all, but the bottom line is this: What do I see when I walk into a Ford, GM, and DC showroom this weekend? Which showroom would I linger in the longest? I don't think it would be Ford...
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I agree that we'll see some more specialty models but I'll bet we only see a Hurricane-based Mustang in concept form; like the Boss 351 V10 from a few years ago. I don't see Ford spending the the time to certify and package that motor when they've proven that the Modular motor can easily make 500 bhp reliably and the owners and aftermarket have proven the motor can make well over 1000 bhp relatively easily. Safety, insurance, and traction are already easily blown away so why bother fitting something else in there. DC and GM don't have any better formula for those issues :).
The flip side is whether or not Ford wants to get that motor into stock racing for some reason. Then we might see a larger production run of some vehicle to get the motor homologated.
It'll be fun to see :)
Dan 2003 Cobra convertible With some stuff and things
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Dan wrote:

Cost and packaging. The new Hemi and LS2 don't have the added expense of 3-4 valve heads, a supercharger and intercooler, plus Ford's cammers require a higher hood line, and more space with the supercharger attached.
Patrick
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Hmm, you might be diappointed then. Word around Ford is that Hurricane is truly just an extension of the Modular family: larger bore spacing, shorter deck, but essentially a new generation of the Modular motors. I don't know for sure, but right now it's my impression that that means more than one cam, around 3 valves per cylinder at minium, and VCT/VVT. I recall a story from year ago speculating on an OHV setup but that wasn't really the case as far as I know. According to what I have heard, this a "stretched' out Mod motor. The length has been increased to widen the bore spacing and allow the deck height to lower a tad. So, dimensionally, there will be a little bit of extra room vertically with less room longintudinally and a slight reduction in overall width.
The quote I heard was, "it's set up to fit into anything that accepts the 5.4 Modular today" and "it's supposed to provide some more displacement in a volume similar to the 5.4". The extra bore spacing is enough to support over 7.0L with, I think, a stroke roughly equivalent to the current 5.4, maybe a tad shorter stroke.
It will easily match anything anyone else is producing right now, but I'm wagering it's still got that bugaboo some of you guys don't like: overhead cams :). Personally, I'm looking forward to a 427 cammer ;).
Dan 2003 Cobra convertible With some stuff and things
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Dan wrote:

Dan,
I personally don't have a problem with a cammer. I've driven a number of mod motored cars and really like the 4.6. My issue is cost. While I love the current Terminator Cobra, I'd be even fonder of them if it was priced like the Mach 1s. I think ditching the blower and intercooler and swapping in a bigger inch, normally aspirated motor would make that price possible. So I thinking/hoping for a 6.2 liter 4 valve Cobra, and 6.2 liter 2 or 3 valve GT.
As for which way Ford is going to go, just before the Hurricane got canceled/postponed, from what I heard the debate pushrod OHC debate was still raging/undecided. We'll see...
Whatever Ford decides, I feel more cubes is win for us enthusiasts.
Patrick
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Patrick,
Yeah, I hear what you're saying and I agree that enthusiasts would benefit. Yet Ford has had at least three larger displacement motors that they could have put in the Mustang/Cobra: the 351, the 5.4, and 7.0(?, V10). They did two of these in low production homologation vehicles and one in a single concept car. And all of those occurred during a period that a stronger competitor pony car was on the market. If they didn't do it then what's different now? What will get them to rethink that model? Maybe the existence of two alternative pony cars and a clear slow down in sales when they hit market would make it happen. I dunno, though, it's hard to count on that.
Additionally, now that SVT has closed shop there's no longer a division dedicated to an exclusive line of performance products to put the motor in. The only hope, then, is that, like you pointed out, one of the niche models, like the Mach I, Boss, Bullitt, etc., gets that motor and that they produce enough of them to keep the price down. But without SVT products drawing a premium price, I have to wonder if the niche products won't get more expensive in the future.
I like the idea. I just don't see the incentive for Ford to make it happen. Yet :).
Dan 2003 Cobra convertible With some stuff and things
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