If you're hungry for power or fuel efficiency, beware of a scam like this one:

Improve Gas Mileage by 20+%
>You can now increase your gas mileage by 20% or more, guarantied. Four (4)
>month trial period. Money back guaranty. Call the number above or send me
> an email its a simple connection to a vacuum line, the Gas Saver adds > microscopic
>quantities of platinum to the air-fuel mixture entering your engine.
>Platinum has the unique ability to make non-burning fuel burn. With >platinum in
>the flame zone, you increase the percentage of fuel burning inside the
>engine from 68% of each gallon to 90% of each gallon, a 22% increase.
>Since unburned fuel leaving an engine is pollution, this 22% of each >gallon would
>normally burn when it reaches the platinum of the catalytic converter.
>Unfortunately, the converter's platinum burns this fuel in the tailpipe, >where the heat
> and energy produced from burning this fuel cannot be harnessed to drive > your vehicle.
I have never heard of such thing. Energy is produced inside the engine
which causes the compression to move the flying disc. Not in the tailpipe
as he claims, even if his thing burns the unburn fuel in the tailpipe, it
will throw away that extra energy. This guy wants to give you 4-month
trial, not even for a second will I try it.
Some people believe they can increase the mileage through a magnet, that's
another phony theory. You can tell from the uneducated sellers.
Reply to
richard
I would agree that this guy probably is a snake oil salesman, BUT this technology is being studied in industrial boiler applications. Never rule anything out completely.
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Striker
Reply to
Striker
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You can use magnet to remove tiny metals off from your fuel, but there is no way that a magnet can change the bonding of Gasoline molecules. Why? Because in every Gasoline molecule, carbon is the only Atom that holds on to itself (or to its own kind(carbon)) and to other atoms very securely.
Sounds like people need to go back to chemistry class. Why many goofy people tried to use fancy word to lie to general public?
Reply to
GasSaver
For a more complete consideration of magnetic fuel devices, check out
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Reply to
Jay Alperson
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Thank you Jay. I tried your magnet on my fuel line in 1982, I didn't notice any change on my car fuel economy; that's why we spent a fortune to research the cure for oil crisis. If you believe your magnet works, please bring your car to show off with our car (that we have doubled in mileage.) Can you bring yours to Seattle KOMO TV or KIRO 7 TV sometimes next week? This way we can prove who is real.
Thanks.
GasSaver
Reply to
GasSaver
Hi,
I have a question about hybrids: is it true that kind of battery used in hybrids can be recharged at most several hundred times?- so after that it needs to be replaced. How many years would such a battery last?
Thanks, Boris
Reply to
boris
Don't know the battery specifics, but I have a neighbor who recently purchased a midsize Ford hybrid. It's like an Escape or ??, it's about the size of a Honda Pilot.
He told me that the thing has a 96HP electric motor which, of course, does most of the start and stop heavy work. He also says that the batter(y)(ies), in the rear of the vehicle, are covered by a special warranty for eight years, or 100K miles. The vehicle warranty is three years, or 36K miles.
Reply to
Anonymous
Sounds right under moderate drive. I'm not sure if Boris is trying to test our knowledge. Every battery has its limitation, if you brake hard (you put in 2A, you only get 1A in return approximately), this explains why some people get 25-32mph on a hybrid. If you want more mileage, plan ahead and try to avoid braking. If you're in a rush, speeding and braking won't save you energy, only with our tune-up vehicles you can speed and brake often, you still will come better than a hybrid 37-41mpg usually on aggressive drive, otherwise 51mpg.
GasSaver
Reply to
GasSaver
Hybrids usually use NiMH (nickel metal hydride) batteries. Generally, 500 to 1,000 full discharge/charge cycles is about the upper limit for the life of such a battery.
But hybrid cars don't discharge their batteries very deeply at all. So the above figures become somewhat meaningless. In that situation, what's important is the cumulative total energy taken from / returned to the battery. And just age and temperature related degradation.
We'll really have to wait and see as a history develops for this battery chemistry in this application.
John
Reply to
John Henderson
Thanks for the info. What about plug-in cars (like Tesla)? Will their batteries die rather fast?
Boris
Reply to
boris
I currently drive a car that's 8+ years old and has 90K+ miles on it - hoping to keep it for 2-3 more years. I feel that car technology could change significantly over the next several years - not sure it's worth buying a new gas or even hybrid vehicle now.
Boris
Reply to
boris
I see. Why do they prefer diesel cars in Europe (as opposed to hybrids)? Also, I have a subie - when I go skiing I never need chains, even in deep snow (unless road is completely closed for traffic - then I can't use it obiously). From reviews (for example, at edmunds.com) Lexus RX hybrid doesn't have a potent AWD system.
Boris
Reply to
boris
OOPS - sorry: Edmunds says that about Highlander, Lexus RX review doesn't say anything about AWD system.
Cons
Third-row seats fold as one piece rather than in split sections, not suitable for off-road or serious winter duties.
Reply to
boris
There are 4 good reasons, 1)for durability 2)for 50% more fuel efficiency(diesel costs more so you come out about 25% better than gasoline) 3)room 4)security.
You don't need a new 2009 Toyota Highlander Hybrid for 25% increase in MPG. We can turn your regular SUV for 30% or better MPG output.
GasSaver
Reply to
GasSaver
I'd expect so - shorter life that those used in hybrids.
I haven't researched the battery types used in full-electric cars, but I'd expect them to be more exotic chemistries, selected with very strong emphasis on the energy-to-weight ratio.
John
Reply to
John Henderson
And in a number of countries diesel fuel is (or was) MUCH cheaper than petrol, tho' there might also have been a compensatory tax on the car... it's a complex issue.
In this context it is noteworthy that Britain was late to take to diesel. The fuel did have a price advantage but no longer since the tax rates were aligned with petrol.
DAS
To send an e-mail directly replace "spam" with "schmetterling"
Reply to
Dori A Schmetterling
Typical guess from common ignorance.
There is one American man making over millions for turning a HUMMER into a 30mpg. I bet you don't believe that news neither, but I believe it because we do similar thing here.
Reply to
GasSaver

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