JOBD on Japanese models?

replying to Catherine Jefferson, jayden wrote: JOBD is definitedly design for Japanese vehicle. As there is OBDII for america, EOBD for eroupe. Japanese vehicle has their own special protocol. So they
develope their own communication protocol for their car.
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On Tue, 05 Apr 2016 12:17:58 +0000, jayden

Would make life a whole lot simpler if all markets used the same propocol - if what you say is true Subaru has to make a minimum of 3 different versions of every computer - and possibly different harnesses as well?
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On 05/04/2016 7:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm pretty sure OBDII, EOBD, and JOBD are all compatible protocols more or less. Maybe a few unusual codes are different between them, but the basics are the same.
    Yousuf Khan
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On Fri, 8 Apr 2016 15:15:39 -0400, Yousuf Khan

All 3 standards are implemented in almost identical methodology, using the same SAE J1962 pinout and connector. Only the actual "regulation" has any appreciable difference. Within the OBD2 standard there are 5 different "protocols" used. Each protocol uyses a different pulse train - with different frequencies and coding. SAE J1850 PWM (pulse-width modulation - 41.6 kbit/s,) is the standard of the Ford Motor Company.
SAE J1850 VPW (variable pulse width — 10.4 kbit/s) is the standard of General Motors
ISO 9141-2 .(This protocol has an asynchronous serial data rate of 10.4 kbit/s. It is somewhat similar to RS-232; however, the signal levels are different, and communications happens on a single, bidirectional line without additional handshake signals.) ISO 9141-2 is primarily used in Chrysler, European, and Asian vehicles
ISO 14230 KWP2000 (Keyword Protocol 2000) I'm not sure how this one works or who, if anybody, currently implements it.
ISO 15765 CAN (250 kbit/s or 500 kbit/s). The CAN protocol was developed by Bosch for automotive and industrial controllers. Unlike other OBD protocols, variants are widely used outside of the automotive industry. While it did not meet the OBD-II requirements for U.S. vehicles prior to 2003, as of 2008 all vehicles sold in the US are required to implement CAN as one of their signaling protocols. It is used in conjunction with one or the other of the standard prorocols on most current vehicles.
Your scanner can tell which protocol to use by a combination of which pins are used and the frequency and/or voltage on the pins..
On top of the mandated OBD2 standard, many manufacturers supply a lot of other data from other systems on the car through the OBD port using a "standard" or "protocol" called EOBD2 - which is not "European" but "enhanced".
Some EOBD2 codes can be read by some basic OBD2 scanners, with better/later scanners also able to read CAN bus codes , and the higher end units capable of reading the EOBD2 codes of MOST manufacturers. No manufacturer is "required" to make their codes available on generic code readers and some may choose to require specific diagnostic equipment to access these codes.
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My only suggestions involves where I would start my research. I'd probably try to email the guys at www.troublecodes.net with my question. Hoping that they knew of a way to force a 'blink code' or maybe one of their 'link partners' that deal with reading systems other than OBDII.
I would also post the question at NASIOC and at www.ultimatesubaru.org .
Maybe the Australians get the same vehicles you are getting? Search for folks building sandrails - some Aussies build them with soob parts.
yeah, definitely try contacting some folks at these links; http://www.troublecodes.net/technical/scaninfo.shtml
good luck
Carl
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On Mon, 05 Jul 2010 23:36:19 +0600, Yousuf Khan wrote:

Turmoil? Nah, no turmoil. We just have so little to discuss about Toyotas that we tend to "wander" a little! ;)
As far as OBDII, I thought the port was universal. My '95 Tercel had one, although it was required until 1997.
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On 7/8/2010 3:34 AM, Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

That's because yours is a North American-market model. I'm talking about an actual Japanese-market model (with right-hand drive, and all of that).
    Yousuf Khan
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