Rear tyre wear

Have had severe wear on the outside rear left tyre on my 05 OBW. I talked to the dealer who said it could be a wheel alignment problem. However, I would
think that if it were, I would see it first on the front tyres, but they both have normal wear. I have since heard that there is an adjustment that can be made on the rear wheels of these vehicles because of the AWD or some such reason.
Has anyone experienced this problem before, and is there an adjustment for the rear wheels? Would appreciate any input, thanks. We drive on the left hand side here in Australia so I guess the camber of the road would be steeper for that particular tyre than one on the other side. Don't know if that makes a difference or not.
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Hi Phil I have an 02 OBW and it was stressed to me to ensure that wheelalignment were carried out on both front and back and to have the wheels rotated every service interval (12500Km) in order to maintain good tyre wear, also I use 38Psi all round. Ben (Oz)
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Why 38 psi? Sounds higher than the manual recommends.

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Try running the 28-29psi in your tyres that Subaru recommend and see how long your tyres last......
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wrote:

**True. I had my tires at 31-32 front and 29 in the back, just like it said in the manual (05 Impreza RS). I noticed the back tire losing air and since I was bringing it in for an oil change, I asked them to look at it. They pulled a nail and the supervisor said to keep all the tires at the higher psi *not* 29psi on the rear like the book. He said that your tires will last longer and wear correctly. Well, alrighty :)
kaboomie
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More than I know... FWD cars need what is often called "thrust alignment" here in the states; it is some sort of 4-wheel alignment. The explanation makes sense if the rear angles are adjustable, since that's what I'd expect from excessive toe-in on that wheel.
I'm told the alignment is different for LHD cars than for RHD cars because of the crown of the road. Since you drive on the wrong side of the road the alignment has to neutralize a slight pull to the left, whereas we drive on the other wrong side of the road and ours have to neutralize a slight pull to the right.
Mike
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My Forester was delivered "out of alignment" The rear tires showed much wear at ~ 7,000 miles while the fronts looked as new. The dealer provided a free realignment and a We're sorry comment. I assume you run close to recommended pressure and rotation interval?

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Always balance a toe setting with the other wheel on that axle. if your rr tire was out, then both rear tires would get 1/4 wear effect on them, the car would have a slight offset in the rear of the car. it could/would be compensated by the front tires setting and in many cases you could never see or feel it. The "thrust" alignment insures that the rear axles are true with the car then we set the front axles true and now the car is driving perfectly straight down the road. You could still have a pull issue, but the car is pointing correctly. http://www.familycar.com/Alignment.htm a good alignment definition page http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=4
--
Stephen W. Hansen
ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician
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Phil wrote:

OK - just to cover the bases, I'll suggest a coupla outside possibilties to keep in mind. Are you the only driver? Have you closely examined the rim to see if it 'tagged' a curb, possibly while operated by another driver? Also, though rare, I have heard of dealers wrecking a car on the lot or transporting it, reparing the damage, then selling it as new.
just fyi
Carl
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to reply, change ( .not) to ( .net)

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Yes, that happend to me :-) The little woman used to drive fast little cars, and consistently gently nudged the outer part of the tire on the curbs with the longer(?) Forester. Didn't hurt the wheels though.
After rotating the tires as recommended, at 31k it became very apparent both right side tires was nearing their useful life. Alignment and frame tested out fine...
H.

talked to

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Phil wrote:

think that if it were, I would see it first on the front tyres, > but they both have normal wear. I have since heard that there is an > adjustment
Hi,
Not at all unusual to have a rear alignment problem w/o a similar problem on the front. If your car has an adjustable rear end, a good alignment guy should be able to take care of it for you. Earlier models like my Loyale didn't always have adjustments, but I think Subaru's learned that lesson. Just for comparison to your problem, the front tires on mine wear "like they were turned on a lathe" to quote a friend, while it absolutely EATS rears due to excessive toe-in (takes off the outer edge in no time.) Alignment guys throw up their hands cuz there's no adjustment built in.
Sometimes you have to go thru a few alignment guys to find the one who "has the touch" required to fix your problem. Expensive, yes, but you want to keep that guy when you find him!
Rick
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good enough, Rick, appreciate the info. Now the search begins......

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Hi Phil!

Common problem. There is an adjustment for rear toe, but not (unless it's something added in the last couple years) rear camber. Rear toe adjusts with an eccentric bolt at the inside of one of the rear arms. Front camber adjustment is an eccentric bolt where the strut meets the hub, the top one, usually. In either case there will usually be reference lines stamped into the bolt head and corresponding assembly. . Pretty easy to DIY if you're so inclined; takes a couple lengths of string, a ruler, and 4 jackstands or whatever to tie the string to. Search the web, and/or check out the SmartStrings owners manual, which can be found here: <http://www.smartracingproducts.com/alignment.htm , for the procedure.
Generically, set the front toe to around 2-3mm total toe in, the rear as close to 0 as you can. I like a fairly sporty feel, so I will set the front camber to max negative (probably a degree or so on the Soobies), again there isn't an adjustment on the back AFAIK. You can purchase and install something called a "crash bolt" from an alignment supply store that will give a couple degrees of adjustment in similar fashion to the front adjuster. Camber is kinda tough to measure w/o a special tool, but you can at least get an idea with a plumb line held against the top of the rim. You want at least a little negative camber (top of wheel closer to car c/l than bottom) in most situations.
Hope this is helpful.
ByeBye! S.
Steve Jernigan KG0MB Laboratory Manager Microelectronics Research University of Colorado (719) 262-3101
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