2000 Lincoln ignition coil problems

My son bought a 2000 Lincoln. It has the familiar problem (I'm told) of oil leaks around the ignition coils and then subsequent failure of
some of those coils. He plans to replace all the oil seals associated with this but first we cleaned all the coils and I checked them on the bench with an ohm meter and they all look the same. I realize of course that this is not conclusive though. These read like a standard three terminal autotransformer type of device, so can I assume that they function basically like a standard ignition coil? Can I apply 12V across the primary momentarily to induce the secondary field? I have a motor driven inturrupter of sorts that would accomplish this. I read about a procedure on line apparently utilizing special Ford test equipment, (WDC COP) and it shows oscilloscope waveforms associated with the coils firing during test. It doesn't show a procedure or connection diagrams though. I contacted the manufacturer of the test equipment, Teradyne, but all they would tell me is that it is Ford test equipment and that the equipment as well as the procedures are proprietory. I would like to perform a similar test using my own scope. Has anyone done anything like this? I would imagine that you could use an inductive pickup similar to the type found on a timing light placed around the secondary lead. I could wind a coil if need be. Does anyone know if this would be a viable procedure, and if so the details of the coil? Thanks, Lenny
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It is more than just not conclusive, it will miss the most common problems, which is a shorted turn. The thing gets hot, the insulation is damaged, two adjacent windings short.
When this happens, it's like having an additional secondary winding that is shorted added to the transformer, and it makes it totally inoperative without changing the resistance of any winding appreciably.
What DOES change is the inductance of both windings, and if you can get your hands on an RLC bridge you can measure that.
Otherwise you could probably test it on the bench with a spark gap and an interruptor just like you'd test an old-style ignition coil. And yes, if you want to see waveforms you could use a resistive load and a magnetic pickup to see a waveform on a scope... but really the bridge will give you a fast enough go/no go indication.
For that matter, you could just use a timing light with a pickup... clip it on each one of them and you should see the light flash if there is good HV... and the light won't flash or will flash intermittently if the coil is bad. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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On Jun 4, 9:02 am, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

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Thanks very much for the great information Scott. I'll pass it on to my son. Lenny.
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