Estimate to repair brake tubing

I would like to get opinions from this newsgroup about an estimate I got to repair metal brake line tubing in my 1987 Toyota Camry.
I was told that the metal brake line tubing going to the rear wheels is heavily rusted and that the tubing should be replaced. I was given a ballpark estimate of $700. The cost of materials was given as around $50. The labor rate is $60 per hour. This works out to about ten hours of labor. I was told that this is strictly a ballpark estimate. As the repair progresses, complications may develop and the amount of labor could rapidly escalate. It might also be advisable to replace fuel lines, which would be another major repair. The estimate was given in October. No visual inspection was done in October. The mechanic was relying on his recollection of the annual state safety inspection which was done in July.
The car has only 55,000 miles. I am the original owner. Currently I drive about 2500 miles per year. The car is running well. If major repairs were not needed I would keep the car one or two more years. I reside in the Hudson River Valley region of New York State, about 70 miles north of NYC. Road salt is used here but many recent winters have had little snow.
I don't do any DIY auto repairs. I will probably take the car to another mechanic for a second opinion. Before doing that I would appreciate opinions from this newsgroup as to what is reasonable to expect.
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If you keep a careful eye on things it will likely last for awhile. Treating the rust on the lines unless they really are about to go could greatly extend their life.

It's a pain in the ass job if it's anything like the '86 mazda 626 I did the same job on. But I did it with car parked on stones without the aid of a lift. There is no way this should take 10 hours on a lift. $50 in materials sounds about right for using OEM lines. Which is the best bet if the entire line needs replacement. If there is just a heavily rusted section that can be relplaced by a new length of generic brake tubing and a couple unions and fittings for where the old line is cut. (<$10 for all)
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So the mechanic gave you a estimate without doing an inspection? You'd best be running to the hills away from this scam artist.
Oh, by the way. I can tell from the constant rumble at idle that your muffler belt tensioner is not properly tensioning the muffler belt. If it fails completely, it will ruin the engine internally. I've got one in stock that I can put on tomorrow. Only $300. But that price may escalate quickly if i find that the muffler belt and the pulleys it runs on need to be replaced also. 8^{)>
Allen Weiner wrote:

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Sounds like they don't want to do the work. It shouldn't be more than a 2hr job.
Allen Weiner wrote:

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If it's just surface rust, pick up a sponge sanding sponge at the hardware store and rub off the surface rust. Then pick up a can of LPS 3 and spray the lines to prrotect from future rusting. Total cost about $12.
On 3 Dec 2003 11:09:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Allen Weiner) wrote:

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Man don't touch them with sand paper or any wire brushes. Just get some rust paint and go over the top.
Sanding or brushing a rusted gas line or rusted gas tank almost always makes pinhole leaks from ripping the rust and a bit of underlying metal away.
Mike 86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33x9.5 BFG Muds, 'glass nose to tail in '00 88 Cherokee 235 BFG AT's
Kent Shaw wrote:

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