Camry's PCV valve

There's no mention in the Camry's owner's manual or scheduled maintenance guide about PCV valve replacement.
Wikipedia says, "Typical maintenance schedules for gasoline
engines include PCV valve replacement whenever spark plugs are replaced."
The '06 Camry Maintenance Guide mentions to replace spark plugs at 120,000 miles or 12 years, and to inspect the engine valve clearances at that time, but no mention at all is made of the important PCV system that recirculates blow-by fuel and water vapor from the crankcase to the intake manifold en route to the combustion chamber for re-burning.
By the way, iridium spark plugs lasting 12 years is great. I remember my old Dodge Colt needed new plugs every couple years or so. I guess that's one of the advantages of having iridium and also having a Direct Ignition or Distributor-less Ignition system. I'm getting into this car talk.
Not sure I'll be able to resist changing the spark plugs for 12 whole years, though. Maybe 8 or 10.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is it possible that the PCV is not a V at all, but a simple orifice?
Back in the olden days, the PCV held a ball on the inside and a calibrated spring. These days, the PCV is just an orifice and does not have a maintenance schedule.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

PCV = positive crankcase ventilation so there is a "V" in a PCV system.
Yes, it is possible that there is no valve in the positive crankcase ventilation system, not sure if the 2006 Camry has a valve or not.
There are two easy ways to check - follow the crankcase ventilation tube from the throttle body to the engine and look for a PCV valve, or look in the factory service manual.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray O wrote:

Jeff, you're a very smart man who knows a lot about cars, but it looks to me like the '06 Camry's PCV valve does have a moving part inside (a valve), so it's not just an orifice in this model :-)
Judging from a diagram in the Emissions section of the Camry service and repair manual I downloaded from CamryStuff.com , the moving part looks more like a cone than a ball. But I know there are both types. The diagram is on Page 1,500.
For other beginners like myself, since the PCV valve is not the empty type, it's possible it may wear out over enough time, and it might be a good idea to change it with the spark plugs every 12 years, or 8 to 10 years if you wanna jump the gun a little bit like me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I just saw John's posting. I'm sure following his suggestion would be a very good idea, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Older Toyota did use oirfice valves, but I don't think any late model car does.
These things like to gum up over time, and spray cleaning has been recommended against. There are cars without a replacement schedule and the valves check out according to instructions (clamp hose, listen for a click; shake valve, listen for clicks; blow in both directions etc etc) but still do not work.
The fact is, a PCV valve and grommet are cheaper than an oil change. I'm just saying do not wait until the seals leak because of an over pressured crankcase (even if the vent hose is supposed to be open to the atmosphere it still happens).

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

I've never seen one, I only broached the possibility. I was searching for a reason why they would not present a replacement interval in the Owner's Manual, and if it is just an orifice, that might explain the omission.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/14/08 10:07 PM, in article g5h497$vku$ snipped-for-privacy@registered.motzarella.org,

The Japanese don't seem to be all that concerned about them. I haven't seen a replacement interval specified for PCV valves on Hondas or Nissans since at least '96. Many of them are all but inaccessible as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

I spoke to a Honda mechanic about the PCV valve on an '05 Accord. Basically there is none you have to worry about servicing. I forgot exactly what he said, but I think he said it was metal and there was no maintenance timeframe on them. He's never had to change one.
-Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave L wrote:

Some vehicles don't even have them anymore. e.g. my Ford pickup has the valve cover directly vented to the air filter housing. Wierd but true.
(my '55 Stude - engine is basically a clone of a '63 Avanti engine, but with the '55 water pump/accessory drive - has the same exact setup, except the oil pan itself is what's vented, but there is also a PCV valve connected to the carb base.)
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yeah, I heard newer engines are doing away with EGR and PCV valves. Some don't even use throttle plates in controlling accelerations anymore.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BTW, accelerations can be controlled by "continuously variable valve lift, as in BMW's Valvetronic system, instead of moving a throttle plate. This cuts down on the piston pumping loss experienced in low speed operations.
On Jul 17, 5:47pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do it every 30K miles, along with the PCV grommet. Many cars only call for "inspections." These valves can still click but do not work as well as new valves.
Now the crank is open to the intake hose through the vent hose, but how some of these still can get over pressurized is beyond me.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
had mine replaced at 50,000 .....new PCV,tuneup cleaned fuel injectors,new plug wires,air fliter have a 99 camry

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jeff, I actually should not have conclusively said that the '06 Camry uses a valve in the PCV system. I think most of the Genertion 5 Camry manual documents available at CamryStuff.com are from the 2002 Camry, and although the '06 Camry is also a 5th Generation Camry, there are some minor differences between the '02 (first model year in the 5th Generation) and the '06 (last model year in the 5th Generation). I guess the '06 Camry is considered Generation 5.5 with the '07 Camry being Generation 6.
There actually are a few documents at CamryStuff.com that are specific to Generation 5.5 (the '06 Camry), but most documents there refer to the '02, which is very similar to the '06, but again, there are some minor differences. So you might be right after all! Hard to say, though, without spending a lot of money to buy the '06 repair and service manual.
All I know is the Camry's official '06 Owner's Manual and the official '06 Scheduled Maintenace Guide I have at home (in hardback edition) don't mention a thing about the PCV valve or system.
Judging from the responses here, I will take a guess and say the '06 Camry does use a PCV valve in the PCV system. We would have to examine an '06 Camry to say for sure. However I'm not going to remove my car's PCV tube to find out until it's time to replace the spark plugs, which is still years away. No use in accidentally breaking something that ain't broke yet :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snipped>
You do not have to remove the PCV tube to see the PCV valve because the PCV tube is connected to the PCV valve. In other words, the valve is not inside the tube.
Open the hood, look for a black hose about the diameter of your little finger between the valve cover and throttle body. If there is a PCV valve, it will be sticking out of the valve cover and the hose will be connected to the valve. If there is no PCV valve, the hose will be connected to a fitting in the valve cover.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Built_Well wrote:

The '06 uses a PCV valve. It is threaded into the valve cover. It is also something you want to check and clean at EVERY oil change. A plugged or non-functional PCV is a large cause of sludge in the Toyota engines.
http://www.camrymanuals.com/manuals/07/2AZ-FE_Emission_Control.pdf should cover it.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Absolutely. A PCV valve and a grommet is about $5-8. Try changing out any over pressured engine seal for that price.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Older ones dont have a pvc valve just an intake hose to the valve cover
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Built_Well wrote:

Use an oem pcv valve if you replace it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.