anti-seize for spark plugs

Is it advisable to use anti-seize for spark plus?
I will soon be changing my 2000 V8 plugs (82K). If I use anti-seize on the plug threads, will it prevent plugs from being 'welded' into block?
Thanks-this group is a real help to me!
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No
No
Great! Don't spend more time or money than you have to on 'urban myths'
Good luck! Simon H
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wrote:

Yes.
It will certainly reduce the chances of that happening. The antisieze is particularly important if it's got aluminum heads. Don't overdo it, just a light coating and don't get it on the part that sticks into the combustion chamber if you can avoid it.

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Kind of off topic. I just changed the plugs on my 99 XLT. I had gotten some anti-seize compound on my concrete driveway. Whats the best way to clean it off?
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wrote:

I don't really know. I'd try gasoline or brake cleaner spray.
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hand cleaner??

Kind of off topic. I just changed the plugs on my 99 XLT. I had gotten some anti-seize compound on my concrete driveway. Whats the best way to clean it off?
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I'll give it a shot. thanks
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Ford does not recommend anti-seize. I just finished changing a set of plugs on a 2001 Sport Trac (4.0L SOHC V-6). Several of the plugs were difficult to reach, but none were seized. I reveiwed th Ford shop manual and there was no mention of anti-seive. The OE plugs did not appear to be coated (although after 7 years and 112k miles I suppose it would not be apparent). Since the OE plugs looked Ok after 112K miles, I doubt they will ever be changed again, so I prefer to not go against Ford's recommendation. Autoilite specifically states that spark plugs should be installed with clean dry threads and specifically recommends against the use of anti-seize.
Ed

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Well, I researched a little further. The Motorcraft site recommends anti-seize compound for aluminum cylinder heads.
Does my 2000 5.0 have aluminum heads?
What is Jim's opinion on this??

Ford does not recommend anti-seize. I just finished changing a set of plugs on a 2001 Sport Trac (4.0L SOHC V-6). Several of the plugs were difficult to reach, but none were seized. I reveiwed th Ford shop manual and there was no mention of anti-seive. The OE plugs did not appear to be coated (although after 7 years and 112k miles I suppose it would not be apparent). Since the OE plugs looked Ok after 112K miles, I doubt they will ever be changed again, so I prefer to not go against Ford's recommendation. Autoilite specifically states that spark plugs should be installed with clean dry threads and specifically recommends against the use of anti-seize.
Ed

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On Sun, 15 Jul 2007 19:39:50 GMT, "C. E. White"

The shop manual for my 99 is silent on the subject. It also says nothing about a torque spec. Nor does it suggest putting dielectric grease on the boot. At some point you can't put every tiny thing someone should know or do in every spot in the manual. On aluminum head engines I think it would be foolish to not use anti-seize.
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I just looked at the Ford Service DVD for a 1999 Explorer - it specified a torque of 13 lb-ft for the SOHC and 15 lb-ft for the OHC. The use of dielectric grease was mentioned in both the text and in the items required sections for both engines. There is no mention of anti- seive anywhere in the sprak plug replacement sections (SOHC or OHC) and it was not list in the items required sections. If you send me your email address I'd be happy to email you PDFs of the procedures from the service DVD.
Ed
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wrote:

I believe you. The point is, there is not unanimity even within Fords own publications. The 99 I was referring to was my 99 GT with the 4.6L.
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wrote:

I'll check my shop manual for a '99 4.6L tonight. I have the manual for a '00 4.6L here and anti-seize is not called for. The torque is specified as 20 Nm (15 lb-ft) and the dielectric grease is listed in the items required box. There is no mention of anti-seize.
I also sent a question to NGK about anti-seize and got the following response:
.....
Ed,
It is typically not recommended to use anti-seize with our plugs as the compound can act as a lubricant during tightening and cause excessive torque and possibly plug failure even if the correct torque is seen with the torque wrench.
The trivalent metal coating (zinc chromate) that is on our plugs is a very non corrosive/resistant metal and is usually all that is needed to resist corrosion and seizure. If it is an application where there may be a lot of water getting into the plug socket or the vehicle is known for corrosion or seizing plugs then I would suggest to use a very small amount of anti seize and be cautious when tightening so as not to over torque. Hope this helps, thank you.
Best regards,
Brandon Peeler
Technical Support Representative
Aftermarket Division
NGK Spark Plugs (U.S.A.), INC.
........
So I guess this is a mixed message. It seems like NGK is saying, you don't need anti-seize, but you can use anti-seize if you want to and if you are careful. Autolite was more negative, saying not to use anti-seize, but their concern was excessive anti-seize contaminating the insulator and shorting out the plug.
Ed
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wrote:

I looked in the shop manual for a 1999 Mustang 4.6L (2V and 4V) and it mentions neither dielectric grease or anti-seize compound. A torque for the plugs is listed. Strangley, in the 3.8L V-6 section of the same model year, the dielectric grease was called out, but still no mention of anti-seize compound. If you look in the manual for a 1998 Mustang, the use of dielectric grease is called for, but it is in the ignition wire section (which is referenced by the spark plug removal/installation section). Apparently who ever worte the spark plug and/or coil on plug sections for the 1999 manual forgot to include a mention of the dielectric grease in one section or the other. Still after looking through multiple models and multiple years, I find no mention of the use of anti-seize compund on the plugs.
Ed
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On Wed, 18 Jul 2007 04:20:41 GMT, "C. E. White"

I think the best solution is to put anti-seize on the plugs that fire odd number cylinders.
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