Better In Sand In 4wd Low Than 4wd High?

Seems like my '98 'burb K1500 has better traction in soft sand when it's in the low range than high.
In the context of snow/ice this seems counter-intuitive to me.
Low range ==> more torque.... More torque ==> greater chance of breaking traction.
But this isn't snow/ice.... and I'm pretty sure it really does go better in the low range - having invoked it several times now when it seemed like I was about to get stuck or had just gotten stuck.
I don't *think* I'm spinning the wheels more/faster in the high range, but don't really have anything to back that assertion up.
Can anybody explain?
--
PeteCresswell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(PeteCresswell) :

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In sand you really want to use low range because sand sucks off a lot of power to move through it and the added reduction gives you added wheel torque without frying tranny. low range was really made for stuff like this) On snow and ice, some swear by low range to limit wheel spin velocity but myself I prefer high range because I can "feel" the surface traction better. When I plow I only use low range when snow is tough and/or traction is there to support it. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Where do you go out on the sand a Nagshead? I usually go to Corolla.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.