nitrogen filled tires

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Hi All I am reading and see places like Costco in my area thats are starting to fill tires with nitrogen. my question is it really work it and if it is why
is better than compressed air?
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fill them with helium and the car will levitate and float to work.

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use hydrogen and become the civilian hindenburg!

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Oh, the humanity!
Texas Aggie wrote:

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I'm Right wrote:

The air you breath is mostly nitrogen anyways, so it would not make much of a difference. I dont know why, but could it be that they are running all their tools off a nitrogen tank instead of having an air compressor? Dont know why they would do that though.
How well does nitrogen compress? could nitrogen offer a firmer ride?
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air you breath is mostly nitrogen anyways, so it would not make much of

The bottled Nitrogen doesn't have the moisture content that your air does. People use Nitrogen for air tools because they can get more pressure. Just a note, if you ever hook up your standard air tools to a Nitrogen bottle, you need to have a governor limiting the amount of pressure getting to the wrench/tool. At the cycle shop, we used to occasionally hook an air wrench onto the Nitrogen bottle to break free a very stuck nut/bolt. Not exactly the safest thing to do, but usually it got it off.
Big Chris
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Big Chris wrote:

I would be worried for anyone that hooked up an air too straight to the nitrogen bottle! most air tools are made for 90-120 PSI, an Industrial Compressed Gas Cylinder ranges from 2000-2600PSI. the bursting pressure of most air lines for air tools is 300-600PSI. the use or a regulator is required if you wish to use your tools more then once. Many industrial and high-end air compressors put out 175 PSI and are regulated down to 90-120. the moisture content may be the most accurate thought. if you are moving a lot of air through an installed air system, water will build up if you dont have air seperators.
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We regulated the pressure from the Nitrogen tank so it wasn't coming out at 1200PSI. We kept it to 250PSI and were using heavy duty air wrenches, though it is still dangerous. Ever seen a socket come off behind 250PSI? Shoots a long ways.....
Big Chris
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Nitrogen doesn't expand as much when heated. I've noticed that my tire pressure can vary as much as 5PSI from early morning (cool) to mid afternoon (hot). In racecars, this pressure supposedly can be enough to cause the tires to burst, but I wouldn't think it would matter for a normal passenger car.
GMC Gremlin

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wrote:
makes it a little hard for the driver to maintain pressure, too.. unless you happen to carry a nitrogen bottle..
they used to put it in motorcycle "air" forks, too, but I never felt any difference... I guess I never generated that much heat.. lol

Mac 03 Tahoe Widelite 26GT Travel Trailer replaced 1958 Hilite tent trailer 99 Dodge Ram QQ 2wd - 5.9L, auto, 3:55 gears
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Air causes rubber to oxidize. We used Nitrogen in the station I worked at over 40 years ago. Air was free, Nitrogen was 10 cents a tire:) There was another advantage. Compressed air has moisture in it, when it gets cold some station operators put alcohol in the air tank to keep the lines from freezing. Spin the tires in snow, generate some static electricity and boom. Nitrogen is dry, non flammable and more temperature stable than air.
Al
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wrote:

A tire? You ever try and get one started on fire? Ya gotta use your head when you hear these stupid stories! -- Best Regards Gordie
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The Nolalu Barn Owl wrote:

The rubber doesn't have to burn to have the alcohol vapor to ignite.
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"Trey"

kinda reminds me of using starter fluid to put changed tires back onto the bead..
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How would starting a tire on fire get it to explode? The static electricity ignites the mixture of air and Alcohol INSIDE the tire. Then there is a very rapid increase in pressure:)
BTW: When I lived on a farm I would burn tree stumps by putting old tires over them and lighting them on fire. All that's left is a bunch of wire hoops. No stump no tires. It makes a hell of a lot of smoke. Man what a hot fire.
Thanks for the regards, glad you realize you need to use your head:)
Al
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| > wrote: | >
<snip>
| How would starting a tire on fire get it to explode? The static electricity | ignites the mixture of air and Alcohol INSIDE the tire. Then there is a very | rapid increase in pressure:)
Has this ever happened? I can't see how static electricity would ignite the alcohol. Where is any arcing going to take place? Inside the tire!?
| | BTW: When I lived on a farm I would burn tree stumps by putting old tires | over them and lighting them on fire. All that's left is a bunch of wire | hoops. No stump no tires. It makes a hell of a lot of smoke. Man what a hot | fire. | | Thanks for the regards, glad you realize you need to use your head:)
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Myth Busters Time!!!
GMC Gremlin

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wrote:

One thing I have found out in life is that a lie will circle the globe before the truth can tie it's shoes. I live in the Great White North of Ontario and I know a lot about spinning tires after almost 40 years of driving. I have never heard this B.S. story in my life. -- Best Regards Gordie
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-- Winston Churchil. And it's not shoes, it's pants.
GMC Gremlin

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"The Nolalu Barn Owl"

i have caused explosions inside a tire with starter fluid. it makes a damb good pop....but the tire holds every time. i highly doubt that a little bit of alcohol could even come close to bursting a tire.
when changing a tire in the middle of no where who wants to lug a tire 20 miles to get it put back on the bead just to drive another 20 miles back to put it on.
here is how it's done step 1) empty the air from the tire and place a jack on the tire by the bead and jack it up under a car bumper to break the bead.
step 2) using pry bars or screw drivers remove the old tire. and reinstall the new one.
step 3) spray starter fluid indies the tire. (amount depends on tire size) too little won't ignite....to much won't ignite either, once you have starter fluid in there stand back and spray the fluid through a lighter as a flame thrower....point it at the tire filled with starter fluid ....BOOM !.. it explodes and the pressure puts the tire right up on the bead.
step 4) fill with air to the proper pressure.
and yes there is probably still an amount of unburnt fuel in the tire that could ignite......guess what.......in all my years i've never seen it happen.
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