Re: A/C question

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I knew someone had to say that!


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You can change the pressure switch yourself because there is a Schrader valve under the switch that prevents loss of R12 when it is unscrewed. A GM switch will outlast the aftermarket junk. Make sure you lube the o-ring on the new switch with a little oil before you screw it in. If you have a friend that knows electronics, have him install a "flyback diode" in parallel with the compressor clutch coil. A 3A, 600V (or a similar rating) rectifier diode from Radio Shack, etc. will do the job. Then your new switch will last forever since it will no longer have an arc drawn at the contacts everytime they open. The arc eventually burns up the contacts, causing the switch to fail prematurely. When you jiggle the connection, you are actually causing enough vibration to make the burned contacts connect temporarily. Sometime in the late '90's GM started putting in flyback diodes, as my '99 Silverado has one.
Randy

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'94 was the changeover year. Most models of cars came both ways that year. So I guess not "impossible" eh?
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Evidence? Guesses don't count.
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The evidence is under the hood of all 1994 automobiles. Start popping hoods. No one's guessing.
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Then your a MORON. 1994 was the change over year. I have a 94 S-Series Blazer sitting in the front yard IT HAS R-12 from the factory. The 94 S Pickups were either one depending on what part of the year they were built. Also have a 94 GEO that is R-12 as well. Maybe you better go back to school. And I know of two other 94 vehicles one is a Ford and the other is a Chrysler They are R12 also
http://www.aircondition.com/wwwboard/alternative/current/7782.html Read the second reply.
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That would be 'you're', not 'your', genius.

Your saying so does not prove anything. Post proof or stfu.

You believe that statements by people who can't spell constitutes proof?
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wrote:

Fine, I'll take a pic of my compressor when I get the chance and post a link to it. How can I prove what year my truck is, even though I know it's a 94. I don't wanna give away more info than I have to...
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The VIN (Vehicle Identification Number) is, oddly enough, useful in indentifying vehicles.
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wrote:

Come take a look at my truck. I INVITE you to. You'll see a nice yellow sticker on the compressor (a Harrison if it matters, OEM I believe) that states it's an R-12 compressor. No labels anywhere else stating otherwise...
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Modern photography technology apparently eludes you. And, you faild to post your address.

Irrelevant. Any number of compressors were used in both R-12 and R-134a applications.
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wrote:

and you are afraid to use your name when you post an article, You remind me of the fellah who showed up at a cock fight with a duck. Besides the others don't have to prove squat to you, If you think they are wrong then it is up to you to prove it. Until then they are right.
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Before you replace the pressure switch, check the metripak connector pins. These pins/connectors have a tendency to lose there spring as they age in an elevated temperature environment. You can re bend the spring clip to repair it or replace it all-together.
Cheers Martin

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Whatever floats your boat. While you're at it, take a picture of the label on the evaporator housing that gives the refrigerant type and charge.

You didn't want to pay...correct?

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wrote:

What label?

Not the $250 for the conversion, which they said they'd have to do so they could re-charge the system to test it.
This shop is good to me, all my really major repairs go to them and they haven't done me wrong yet.

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The label that states the refrigerant type and charge.

But you stated that you get cold air when you jumper the low-pressure switch. That would indicate that there is at least enough refrigerant in the system to allow testing. Which tends to support my contention that the shop in question is not qualified to do A/C work.

That you know of.

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wrote:

I said what I did because there's no label on the evaporator box. Never was.

I'm not going to complain about what they did or didn't do, considering there's no record ANYTHING was done when I asked them to look at it since they didn't charge me.

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*Somewhere* under the hood is a refrigerant identification label that will state the type of refrigerant used, and the amount necessary to charge the system. Most are on the evaperator case, but all are near the service fittings.

Then, either they are not competent to service A/C, or, they threw a number at you to keep you from asking for free work.

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On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 11:42:03 GMT, Mike Levy

OK, I take that back, there IS a label, it's just facing the fender. Makes it hard to read without a small mirror, or removing the fender.
Makes no diff. anyway, I fiddled a little with the switch/contacts in question and it now blows cold again...

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You dont have to open the system to replace the switch! It just unscrews and there is a shrader valve that holds in the pressure, just like on your tires. It is probably just a bad connection at the switch anyway. If you move the connector and it kicks in it is most likely just the female spade terminals inside the connector that are loose. get some needle nose plyers and squeese the spades a little and try it again. If you have to you can get some spade connectors and replace the connector altogether. just cut it off and put on two female spades on the two wires and hook it back up to the low pressure switch. It doesnt matter which wire goes where. No big deal.

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