"BMW 3 Series Coupe gets new engine"

Page 2 of 2  

Yes, but you may not have. You might want to look up the original quote.
--
Need Mercedes parts? http://parts.mbz.org
Richard Sexton | Mercedes stuff: http://mbz.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Henry VI, Part 2. "The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers." Shakespeare's characters viewed the lawyers as an impediment to their plot. Now that lawyers number over 1,000,000 in the U.S. alone, they are an impediment to EVERYTHING.
Why lawyer jokes don't work: Lawyers don't think they're funny and everybody else doesn't think they're jokes.
R / John

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(top posting corrected)

http://www.howardnations.com/shakespeare.html
"...Ironically, the rallying cry of the lawyer bashers has become Shakespeare's quote from Henry VI: "THE FIRST THING WE DO, LET'S KILL ALL THE LAWYERS."
Those who use this phrase pejoratively against lawyers are as miserably misguided about their Shakespeare as they are about the judicial system which they disdain so freely.
Even a cursory reading of the context in which the lawyer killing statement is made in King Henry VI, Part II, (Act IV), Scene 2, reveals that Shakespeare was paying great and deserved homage to our venerable profession as the front line defenders of democracy.
The accolade is spoken by Dick the Butcher, a follower of anarchist Jack Cade, whom Shakespeare depicts as "the head of an army of rabble and a demagogue pandering to the ignorant," who sought to overthrow the government. Shakespeare's acknowledgment that the first thing any potential tyrant must do to eliminate freedom is to "kill all the lawyers" is, indeed, a classic and well-deserved compliment to our distinguished profession.
Today's Jack Cades can readily be found throughout the insurance industry and in manufacturing, pharmaceutical, and chemical companies. They want to dismantle the tort system. They want to disrupt the judiciary and abrogate the common law, to the detriment of the rights of individual citizens, consumers, and injured persons who deserve competent representation and adequate redress for harm done to them."
No, I'm not a lawyer.

Uhh, yeah. You look stunning in that tinfoil hat.
--
Need Mercedes parts? http://parts.mbz.org
Richard Sexton | Mercedes stuff: http://mbz.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The appearance of the law profession amidst a society might well be the first sign of that society's progress into civilization. When that society allows that profession to co-opt every facet of its existence, that civilization faces its demise. My position is not that lawyers are bad, but rather that too many lawyers is bad.
American society would be seriously damaged if all lawyers were eliminated. But reducing their number to one suitable to handle the Jack Cades and officiate over normal civil and criminal proceedings would be beneficial. The proliferation of the lawyer class which began in the sixties resulted in thousands of underemployed practitioners who would either starve, find a different profession, or develop a market for their chosen profession. The result was the latter.
For every triumph by lawyers getting the bad guy (Vioxx perhaps, the Pinto fuel tank for sure) there are other examples that are heinous (breast implant suits, BMW's failure to report minor shipping damage repairs). Classes are represented and rewarded without any knowledge on their part. (I got 62 cents for a "defective" microwave the manufacturer repaired prior to the lawsuit ... an award for my "inconvenience," not for any damages to me ... while the law firm made a couple million. I refused to cash the check.) Lawyers who lose in court threaten appeal unless a settlement is made (if I do something like that to you, it's extortion, if a lawyer does it to you, you're screwed).
The maintenance of an overlarge legal profession places a hidden tax upon every member of society. It's rolled into the cost of everything from groceries to health care. Some of that cost is truly beneficial (less likelihood of spoiled groceries?), but much is not (tons of food is wasted, charity organizations don't get yesterday's bread). Litigation is a growth industry.
Mass execution of the lawyer class is a ridiculous rallying cry to what is a real problem. The only solution is to make it harder to become a lawyer (with a million of 'em, it's hardly an elite group) and allow attrition to follow its course. Not likely. Or perhaps you're looking forward to a world in which every human interaction requires legal counsel (we'll need ten million of them)? Better take your hat back. It's more flattering on you.
R / John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, it certainly not the *only* solution. We don't have the problem here in Canada you yanks do down there largely due to the reasons that a) the loser pays the winners legal fees and b) contingency payments aren't legal up here (I don't think, I'm fuzzy on this)
So, it's not the lawyers per se it's the framework in which they operate.
Keep in mild also the US is unique in the world in one respect: most countried, especially in Europe put artists, scientists etc on their currency. All the faces on American paper money are lawyers.
So to some extent one is tempted to say "what do you expect when a country is by, of, and for the lawyers".
--
Need Mercedes parts? http://parts.mbz.org
Richard Sexton | Mercedes stuff: http://mbz.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Point well taken. As their proliferation occurred through a rather bizarre form of supply-side economics, demand must be reduced. The contingency system has its benefits, the little guy can take on the big guy. It might be reasonably limited (I don't think the lawyer and his client should enjoy the windfall profit of punative damages ... they're essentially society punishing the wrongdoer, society should benefit). Loser pays would be interesting, but I suspect contingencies would just be modified to account for the additional risk to the litigator (say 50% plus expenses instead of the relatively standard 30%).
Within minutes after I read your post, I was assaulted by a tv ad from a law firm trolling for class members (faulty pacemakers and diffribulators). Sigh.
We don't have the problem

Or perhaps you just have a smaller percentage of litigators?

Washington - no Jefferson - yes Lincoln - yes Hamilton - yes Jackson - yes Grant - no Franklin - no
Lincoln (perhaps Hamilton) was the only one who made his primary mark in the practice of law.
Of course, if you go to the higher denominations, lawyers do prevail. Only Woodrow Wilson ($100K) was not (an academic instead).

Well, I guess I could always claim my dual citizenship.
R / John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Uh, yeah. and let's not forget "Dr. Legal" in the Aileen-what's her face serial killer trial.

I don't know. It would be interesting to see that statistic. I have a sense it's about the same frankly.

Right, nw try to find a Eropran country with a picture of a lawyer on its money.

I always did whe I lived in the US :-)
I don't dislike the US, it's 10X bigger in population in Canada. Your good people are oh so good but jeez you sure got some whackjobs down there. I have a lot oa lawyer friends but they're the rare "good" ones that do much more good than harm and are equally disgusted by the things you are, ergo cries of "kill all the lawyers" seems to me to ne a non-starter, or to put it another way, go ahead but please don't kill mine.
--
Need Mercedes parts? http://parts.mbz.org
Richard Sexton | Mercedes stuff: http://mbz.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So you can fit poorer quality 'spare parts' not approved by the car maker, and then sue that maker when things go wrong? Seems mad to me...
--
*When blondes have more fun, do they know it?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In the U.S., you are entitled to a risk free life and every adverse occurrence must be blamed on someone else.
R / John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm not sure I understand the premise of your question. The speedometer has no bearing on the Top Speed. The speedo simply reads what you are telling the car to be doing. The speed limiter kicks in with or without an electronic speedometer.
Why spin a speedo needle with a cable when you can pick up the data electronically from the main computer and display it? Speed is needed by the computer for many different functions, collecting speed data electronically makes it easier to distribute the data to the places where it is used. I don't know about Porsches, but I would be surprised if they do not use an electronic speedo.
And, if one bothers to actually work the numbers, one would find that top speed and red line arrive at pretty close to the same time. Limiting engine speed to below red line seems to make lots of sense to me, doesn't it make sense to you?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Maybe I missed something, but where is "speedometer" mentioned in this thread?

For some (but not all) the current BMW cars limited to 155, this is close to redline in 5th, not the OD 6th.
Tom K.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry, I read Electronic Speed Limiter as electronic speedometer. My bad ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The sensible mass market German manufacturers have sort of agreed not to compete on this, and if the cars are limited their government does not bring in an overall speed limit...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

However, the agreed Euro 'limit' is 155 mph.
--
*I get enough exercise just pushing my luck.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike wrote:

My Supra TT will still take it. 8)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.