69 vette

i took my 69 vette out for its first time had trouble starting up once it was running it ran good til it started to get hot the car started bucking and cuting out hard to start then i would have to let cool down
for about 15 min car would run good for alittle bit and then start bucking and cutting out is the starter the problem.69 427 435 hp 4spd
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On Tue, 2 May 2006 22:44:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (John Moore) wrote:

normally will not even make a noise much less turn the car over..) sounds to me like a fuel problem..or even vapor lock ... Toss an ice bag on the side of the carb for a few minutes if it happens again...
Bob G.
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Check the choke pulloff first, (when engine is warm is the choke blade completely open) then when it's hot and bucking, turn off the engine and look down into the carb and look if you can see fuel trickling onto the butterflies (stuck float).
John Moore wrote:

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How hot is hot? These old cars ran about 180-195 normally, but commonly climbed to 200-220 due to lots of reasons. If hot, you need to check radiator, fan, water pump, block rust, coolant ratio and condition, spoiler intact, radiator seals, and so on.
If it is really hot, then you could have fuel percolating problems. Common spots are fuel pump, fuel line, and carbs. Check that the fuel line is not against the intake, block, or water pump. A heater hose could lay on the line and overheat it.
People frequently cut the metal lines and insert aftermarket fuel filters with rubber hose. These can be trouble spots as they can restrict the flow and lay on the engine.
You could also have a bad or low capacity pump. I've run into many rebuilt pumps which do not have the capacity for a big block. The rebuilder just stuffs the generic parts into a housing, and then the parts store sells them as whatever application the number on the side is. However, the stuff making volume and pressure are not. The best case is to use a real genuine new AC pump, or one from a respected restoration rebuilder. It costs a lot more, (and I mean a LOT), but then the car runs like new.
Check the other stuff first.

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.

You can buy new hi-volume fuel pumps almost anywhere now. No need to look for an OEM pump.
Al
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John Moore wrote:

Another possibility may be rust particles from the gas tank clogging the fuel filter and maybe entering the carburetor, or even clogging the filter bag over the fuel outlet in the gas tank, restricting flow volume.
You could disconnect the fuel line and then turn the engine over with the line end in a glass jar so you can collect some gas and inspect for any sediment in the jar; or, put a clear glass filter in your fuel line so you can see any sediment there.
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