Brake Line

All my vehicles are falling apart. 1996, Ram SLT, 1500, 5.9, Now the rear brake line blew just in front of the rear wheel on the drivers side. It rusted out where there was a rubber nub on the line, I assume
to protect it from a bolt head nearby and whole front reservoir for the brake fluid went dry. I've heard of being able to splice in a piece but have never done anything like this. The whole line actually looks bad. Do you have to remove the fuel tank to replace this? Do they make a piece for this or do you buy tubing and bend it? I was reading in the Haynes Manual but it isn't real specific. The bleading procedure seems kind of complicated too. Any help would be appriciated.
Steve
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Do not! I repeat, Do Not splice a brake line. Replace it! If your not going to to it right, then do me a favor, don't drive behind me. If your not sure how to do this, hire a pro.
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Oh, give me a break. If done properly, a splice will work just fine.
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He said the whole brake line looks bad, why take a chance on it?
Ken W
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That is not the point. The point was that the person I responded to made a general comment that any repaired line is unsafe and that is complete bullshit. As for the OP's line, since I didn't see it, I have no idea how bad it really is because sometimes they look far worse than they really are, do you actually know?
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On 30 Apr 2006 18:02:53 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@msn.com wrote:

A PROPERLY spliced brake line is safe. It entails double flaring the solid portion of the line, and using a proper flare nut and coupling to connect a replacement brake line of the proper type, size, and material. NEVER use compression fittings or copper tubing, and do not attempt it without the proper double flaring tool anf a certain level of expertise in its use. ***
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A properly spliced brake line is safe. If you have the proper tools to to the job. The likelyhood of the whole line being rusted and crap is there. might just as well replace it. Why would you half ass the job? you would just be going back under the truck in a month or two anyway.
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I'm with the bunny on this. Why would ya go through the bs? If it is going away in one place....Imo it is easier to replace the line rather than attempt a splice.
Reading the op he would probably be better served sending the repair out.
Roy
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My brake line had failed in the same place That line is a PITA to "just replace" but is not all that difficult to repair where it failed. I can't speak for the OP here, but in my case, the line was ok (like new actually) about 1 foot past the bend where they "all" seem to fail so I simply replaced it from that point up to the manifold where it begins. If the whole line seems rotten, then I completely agree, replace the whole thing but doing that is not easy and unless you can somehow find a direct factory pre-bent replacement, you will still need just about ALL of the same tools and abilities that are required to repair it.
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-Chris
05 CTD
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Not that I'm aware of so exactly what is the part #, cost, and availability of the rear line for that year RAM and is it pre-bent.
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in a difficult to reach position, where replacement is difficult, and repair is simpler, and adequate. I'ce replaced the last foot of full-length main brake lines on many vehicles. ***
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On 30 Apr 2006 18:02:53 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@msn.com wrote:

surplus solid rocket gasket material from the Space Shuttle SRB program.
Haven't heard the guy post here for a while however. Who knows we may be seeing the beginning of another NASA development that has application far and wide from it's original usage. Could very well be following in the footsteps of WD-40, or Teflon.
History unfolding here and now, regards, Joe.
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