$.09 fix for Grand Marquis power window

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Mark opined


That is EXACTLY my point... how many power windows in 3 - 10 year old cars have you tried to fix to cure stalling problems?
I've done a few... all different causes.
I have ALSO had to adjust more than three garage door openers to trip reversing switch .... The garage door is infinitely easier to handle, only because you can adjust the door spring tension first, then the door with the opener.
Tolerances on a garage door are on the neighborhood of 1/4 inch, even more before they are all the way closed.
On a car window, about 1/8 to 1/16 of an inch.
So my "untested theory" is empirical and practical FACT.
YOURS is actually tested but will NOT work in the "real world"
--
- Yes, I'm a crusty old geezer curmudgeon.. deal with it! -

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Not quite.A garage door can be set up so it will basically fall closed, so virtually no current is required to close it. It can then be set up to stop if there is any resistance to closing, without much danger of the door being stuck open. A 5% increase in closing current means something.
By contrast, MOST power windows require significant current to raise them even at the best of times. A bit of grunge in the track, or whatever, causes an increase in closing current so it is hard to get them set to the point where they will always close effectively, yet will stop before doing harm if a body gets in the way. A 5% increase in current means nothing at all.
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On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 22:49:56 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@sny.der.on.ca wrote:

Yet they still have adjustments for restrictions in either direction. Wonder why that is?
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Sharon K.Cooke wrote:

Thanks for the tip, but I think the part number is 74410 instead of 74409 for the plugs. I've never seen them in any of the HELP! displays around here, but now that I have a less expensive and better solution, I think I'll skip the nylon plugs anyway because they simply will fail again. Besides, $6 for three small nylon plugs is a little over the top too. This is certainly not one of Ford's better ideas. I'd like to have $.09 for every nylon plug failure on Ford power window regulator products for the last 20 years. Stan K.
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Aren't these the same stupid plugs that always fail in the power motor of my Chryslers? Sounds like it, wouldn't blame it on Ford, maybe on whoever came up with those dumb nylon things in the first place.
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"Harry Face" wrote

Blurry pictures about half way down... http://www.lincolnsonline.com/article27.html
The big driven gear has a 3-sided opening in it's middle.
The smaller inner piece has a 3-sided protrusion that goes inside the gear's opening, the other side connecting to the mechanism that actually moves the window.
When assembled, the inner piece's "corners" point to the flat sides of the opening, creating 3 spaces between the inner's sides and the gear's points. The nylon spacers fit in those spaces.
The spacers have a certain amount of squishable "give", so if the window jams, the center piece's rounded corners can compress the spacers a bit and jump over them, acting as a type of safety clutch.
Over time, the spacers (as the page says) turn to mush, and one day the big outer gear is happily spinning away, but there's no longer a firm connection to the center piece, so the window goes nowhere.
Stan has put metal nuts in place of the spacers, so no matter what (or who) may be jamming the window, it will continue to close at full force as long as the switch is held. An excellent way (as others have said) to kill a child, or maybe strip the gear, break the window or rip out the regulator.
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MasterBlaster wrote:

the big

connection to

(or who)

long as the

child, or maybe

Hmm guess I should have called them "stupid nylon things" then. Would be great if they were plastic AND didn't disintegrate though...Frenchy
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On Thu, 20 Jan 2005 12:36:36 GMT, "MasterBlaster"

My solution to the crushed nylon slugs on my F150's and CV's is/has been to clean everything up as grease free as possible. Assemble the parts onto the spindle and fill the area with epoxy. The so-called clutch effect no longer exist but, I don't know that it really ever did; the window will stop with the same amount of force as it always has. If you open the motor, you will see that it is stopped by work load with the use of a bi-metal contact on one of the brushes that heats quickly when load is increased on the motor and stops the motor. I have placed a rubber ball into the opening when the window is closing and it will still stop at the same place with either the slugs or the epoxy fill. I believe the slugs are used to quiet the operation of the window as the noise from the motor is the only thing have been able to notice that is different.
Lugnut.
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