Relieving Fuel System Pressure Ford Ranger

This is from http://www.chiltonlibrary.com (requires a library card number to get in) section on Ford Ranger 2000-2003:
"Relieving Fuel System Pressure
All Sequential Fuel Injection (SFI) fuel injected engines are equipped with a pressure relief valve located on the fuel supply manifold. Remove the fuel tank cap and attach fuel pressure gauge T80L-9974-B, to the valve to release the fuel pressure. Be sure to drain the fuel into a suitable container and to avoid gasoline spillage. If a pressure gauge is not available, disconnect the vacuum hose from the fuel pressure regulator and attach a hand-held vacuum pump. Apply about 25 in. Hg (84 kPa) of vacuum to the regulator to vent the fuel system pressure into the fuel tank through the fuel return hose. Note that this procedure will remove the fuel pressure from the lines, but not the fuel. Take precautions to avoid the risk of fire and use clean rags to soak up any spilled fuel when the lines are disconnected. An alternate method of relieving the fuel system pressure involves disconnecting the inertia switch."
In the job I'm doing this doesn't apply (I didn't have any pressure), but I'm wondering about it, the last sentence in particular. What does the inertia switch have to do with relieving fuel system pressure? Isn't the inertia switch electrical?
-- (||) Nehmo (||)
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Yes, but if the pump isn't running, it cannot pump any fuel into the lines. Remember, if the inertia switch is activated or the electrical connection is disconnected, the fuel pump will not run. When you change your fuel filter on the truck, the first thing you have to do is relieve the fuel pressure from the lines. This is easily done by disconnecting the electrical connection from the inertia switch and then turning the key to start the truck. Since the pump will not come on, the truck will stall out once the fuel left in the line burns off. The fuel lines will have no pressure in them and then it is safe to remove the fuel filter.
Otherwise, if you didn't relieve the pressure, when you unhooked the line from the filter, there is a very good chance you would end up being sprayed with fuel from the pressurized line. Not a good thing, especially if you happen to have a trouble-light under the truck with you.
Sharky
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And that is why the smart monkey uses a flourescent trouble light....
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Jim Warman wrote:

Goodun' Jim. I've started using screw in fluorescents in all of my old fashioned "trouble lights". Does that count? Facetiousness aside,I have both. One fluoro tube ~12" and one cage style with a fluoro screw in. The screw in bulbs work great and aren't near as fragile as even "rough service" bulbs. It's been in there almost a year.
Am I at least a smart(er) monkey?
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Tom Adkins wrote:

================ I bought one of those fluoro screw ins for my drop light at the shop.
I dropped it. It broke. It was about $4 best I remember.
I own Snap-Ons dual flourescent drop light. I keep breaking those too. They're about $6 apiece.
I'm hell on drop lights.
I carried my Snap-On home. Have'nt broken the bulbs yet.
I went back to regular ole "rough service" 75wt'rs in my shop drop lights. Still breaking 4 or so a week. But, the price is much lower. Though the lighting is no where near as good as the flourescent.
any whoooo...... that's my rant.
~:~ Marsh ~sips his crownroyal~
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Marshal Monster wrote:

Hmm. I put one in mine (on the suggestion of my 14 year old son as a "maybe") and it's lasted about 12 months so far. Used to go through a "rough service bulb" at least once a week or so. If the cage is bent and contacting the bulb from the get go... maybe?
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Tom Adkins wrote:

========== I use the metal caged lights, it's just a hardheaded "what I'm used to" thing.
And yes, that's the primary reason I go through so many bulbs.
But, in my defense, I'm rugged on a drop light. Keep in mind that EVERY vehical I work on is getting the use of it because I work underneath most of the time on trannies. (cept'n fwd cars, then 1/2 the time is underthehood)
I'm not curtious on a drop light and I'm constantly shoving it, jamming it, lodging it, into areas it reeeellly ought not be put in if you want one to stay like new. But, it makes my job easier when I can see the hidden brackets, bolts, and wires that the OE's like to hide nowadays. My SnapOn just doesn't tend to want to go places that I can shove that old school unit into. (without voiding the warranty lol)
Any whooo... In the past I tried keeping replacement cages on hand for when I fubarred it too bad. But, that was years ago. I've learned to deal with the cost of the bulbs and about once a year I cut the end off the one I'm using, make into a dropcord, and buy me another disposable (lol) droplight.
I'm working on 15-20 cars a week........ shoving droplights in areas that they shouldn't go....... well....it speeds things up a bit. To me, the cost is negligable.
akin to using Charmin, or dollor store toilet paper. I'm willing to pay the cost.
lmao
~:~ marsh ~:~
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