Taurus tie rod question

Had my 96 Taurus jacked up to check the brakes and noticed some horizontal play in the front wheel. I immediately thought tie rod end but then I noticed the play was at
the other end under the steering boot. Anyone know if this is an easy or hard repair? Does the power steering bar need replacing?
Thanks in advance
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On 20 Nov 2005 04:31:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@i-zoom.net wrote:

The movement you see is an indication of inner socket wear. The repair for this condition is replacement of the tie rod which includes the inner socket or, replacement of the steering rack with what is called in the trade a long rack which includes new tie rods for both sides. In an older vehicle or a vehicle with many miles on it, the most cost-effective solution to the problem is to use the long rack. The reason for this is that the steering rack normally accumulates wear resulting in the fluid leakage. replacement of the steering rack is easy enough if you have a way to fully support the vehicle. if you choose replace only the tie rod assembly you will need a special socket to reach into the steering right and disconnect the inner socket from the steering rack. The front of the vehicle must be supported in a way that allows you to listen the rear some frame bolts enough to allow it to drop down a couple of inches thereby easing removal of the steering right through the left side wheel opening. It will be required to reset the front wheel alignment once the new rack is installed. Another thing to be mindful love during replacement of a stirring right is that the clock spring for the airbag system is involved with the steering column and some care should be exercised to avoid damage to the clock spring unit.should you damage the clock spring unit you're looking at a $300 repair to return the airbags to operation.
Lugnut
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Addendum... the rack can be damaged if care isn't taken to counteract the twisting force of removing and reinstalling the inner tie rod end.
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On Sun, 20 Nov 2005 14:12:03 GMT, "Jim Warman"

Judging from the typos, my Dragon NS wasn't listening very well this morning. I remember the clock spring problem because I paid for the first couple I screwed before I gained that "experience". And yes, it is also easy to screw the rack internally if you don't remove the tie rod properly. An, I have seen more than one lock pin come out of an inner socket after replacement allowing it to unscrew and lose steering. For a DIY'er, I think the long rack is definitely the way to go and it gets all new or reman parts for about the same price as a couple of tie rods.
Lugnut
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I have actually seen some new style inner tie rods that don't even have pins, they suggest lock-tite on the threads and lots of prayer. What has this world come to, we are using glorified glue to hold important stuff like steering components together!?!? :P
As far as the tool that was mentioned earlier in this thread somewhere, you can often rent them at the auto parts store or you can buy them off the Snap-On/Matco/Mac truck for about $70 or so. I prefer the tool truck version (which I bought) because it has several different size crowfoot style adapters which lock into the tool vs the auto store rental which is basically a two-size uber-deepwell socket.
Dave
lugnut wrote:

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