Another stupid question

The delta 88 Im working on has a current leak somewhere. We put a new batter in it th eother day, the next day it was dead. I'm faily sure the alternator is OK.
My plan is to put an ammmeter between the + lead of the battery, and the batter cable, and then one by one pull fuses until the current draw drops to 0, and then trace from there. I'm guessing there is a bulb or some other low current device (turn signal, hood, glovebox, whatever, that is staying lit all night.
Any other suggestions about how to troubleshoot a situation like this?
Thanks Matt
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Have the alternator checked. This could be as simple as checking the voltage at the batter terminals with the engine running, should be up around 14VDC. If it's 12-13VDC, suspect an alternator problem.
If that's okay, first thing I'd do is check any aftermarket electrical equipment that is installed (ie: stereo, alarm, car starter, etc). Sometimes the wiring isn't done as professionally as it should and shorts out after a while.
Steve

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Matt wrote:

The current will not drop to zero. Expect the initial reading to be as high as 200ma for a few seconds and then it should drop to perhaps 30ma when the computer goes into sleep mode. That's the general idea. You may have other parasites bringing the rest level a bit higher, but not the draining type. You should find the offender easily.
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Matt wrote:
Delta 88 has a current leak somewhere. We put a new battery in it, the next day it was dead. I'm fairly sure the alternator is OK. My plan is to put an ammmeter between the POS lead of the battery and the battery cable, then pull fuses one by one until the current drops to 0, and then trace from there. I'm guessing there is a bulb or some other low current device that is staying lit all night. Any other suggestions? ____________________________________________
Before disconnecting battery, check for alternator diode leak by disconnecting fat battery charging wire from terminal on alternator then connecting ammeter between wire and terminal.
Note: It is a hot wire connected directly to POS on the battery. Avoid grounding the wire, tools or ammeter during removal, testing and re-installation.
Good luck.
Rodan. ____________________________________________
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unhook the negative cable and hook a test light between the cable and the battery and look at the light and see if it is dim or bright, if it is bright then start one by one, pulling fuses, until you see the light go dim, when you see that happen you will have the source of your drain, and then check all that are on that fuse.
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"Matt" wrote:

You are on the right track but you might double check the charging system to make sure the battery is getting charged too.
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Yes, I'd disconnect [ pull battery cable first ] Isolate and insulate alternator wires first. My guess is for the battery to go dead that quickly, the Alternator diodes are more likely a culprit than the accessories.
Your plan to check draw sounds good, and I'd do it after ruling out alternator
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