DEX-COOL, Conventional Green, & G-05... My Experiences

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Sure is, lol. Glad to hear conventional green worked for you. I hope the people that converted it back flushed it several times and ran a chemical cleaner in it for a 4 - 6 hours to get all the DEX-COOL residue out of that engine.
BTJustice
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I'm pretty sure they did, it was there for 12 hours of labor on the receipt thing. The only way that GM would pay for it to be done was that we had to take it to the dealership we bought it from. At first they were kind of reluctant and then we got the GM rep on the phone at the service counter and I guess he chewed out the technician because they wanted to charge us for the coolant.
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Bonทneทville wrote:

Bullfeathers. Ethylene Glycol antifreeze has been used in engines with aluminum compoenents and in aluminum-block engines for decades. Even by GM.

Temperature is temperature. There's nothing "balanced" differently at all.

Wouldn't surprise ME at all. If I were a GM owner again (heaven forbid the day, but at the rate Daimler is wrecking Chrysler I may have no choice...) I would dump the DexCool immediately and run a G-05 based coolant at far more frequent change intervals. The ONLY reason GM went to DexCool is to try and extend service intervals for advertising purposes (Lookee! you can weld the radiator cap on and NEVER worry about it! <nudge nudge wink wink>). If you REALLY want the car to last a long time and don't care so much about change intervals, your objective may be at cross-purposes for GMs intended use of DexCool anyway.
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I like that post. Good one Steve.
BTJustice

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On Sat, 4 Oct 2003, Buford T. Justice wrote:
<an excellent post about coolant>
I heartily second your recommendation NOT to use Dex-Cool. In my sad experience with several cars, it greatly hastens corrosion and plugging of cooling system components and attacks numerous different gasket/seal materials.
Green stuff is fine, G-05 is probably better. But no more Dex-Cool in my vehicles, ever.
DS
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http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&threadm <60B531 .89C051A1%40no.spam&rnum&prev=/groups%3Fq%3DDEX-COOL%2BG-05%26hl%3Den%26l r%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26oe%3DUTF-8%26start%3D10%26sa%3DN
I ran into an old post of yours while researching G-05 just a couple of minutes ago. I never could figure out why someone would want to use distilled water but for a completely different reason. In order to get a good flush, it is best to back flush a cooling system. I think you wouldn't get a good flush by simply opening the drains and pouring in distilled water until it runs out clear. The back flushing tee and a garden hose work so much better and quicker, lol.
BTJustice

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http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&frame=right&th=4 7c3cbfc70d77754&seekm<5E151B.7E112939%40no.spam#link14

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Using the garden hose..... Depending on where you live, using the garden hose to backflush may be more convenient BUT... doing so also introduces a LOT of harmful minerals to the system. I happen to live in a very hard water area and have replaced several radiators in cars over the years due to mineral deposits clogging up the radiator tubes.
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On Mon, 06 Oct 2003 19:42:41 GMT, "Philip ฎ"
|Using the garden hose..... Depending on where you live, using the |garden hose to backflush may be more convenient BUT... doing so also |introduces a LOT of harmful minerals to the system. I happen to live |in a very hard water area and have replaced several radiators in cars |over the years due to mineral deposits clogging up the radiator |tubes.
Current thinking is that the residual tap water left in the block after backflush & drain is beneficial. The balance of the water added should ideally by RO water. Distilled if RO is NA. Rex in Fort Worth
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Rex B wrote:

Except that it ISN'T. Any residual minerals have the potential for screwing up the corrosion inhibitors in the coolant OR precipitating out and clogging the radiator. Hard water (calcium) typically doesn't upset corrosion inhibitors and in fact my help inhibit corrosion by keeping the pH high... but it also precipitates out. Sulfurous water won't precipitate out, but tends to lower pH and override corrosion protection. Iron precipitates and "binds up" some of the corrosion inhibitors. Chlorine and amine added to municipal water are corrosive to iron engine components. Basically, any impurity commonly found in north American tap water is at best a non-helpful thing to have in the coolant.
The safest course of action is to flush with hose water, drain completely (including the block drain plugs), and fill with a mix of distilled water and antifreeze.
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I am lucky. The water in my hometown is in between soft and medium. Keeps the cost of soap down, lol.
BTJustice

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Yes, that was a very good post...Now should I be a little bit worried with my 2001 GMC Safari, and 2000 Impala with Dexcool...I have basically thrown GM's 160,000 km recommended change frequency out the window and decided to go to 80,000 kms change frequency on Dexcool...Its not that expensive to change...Would you do the conversion process instead or live with it? Steve

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Gotta go with your gut, but lots of people have done it without any problems that I know of thru numerous hours of research on DEX-COOL. Be sure to follow the steps in my original post.
BTJustice

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There is a problem with your theory. Dex-cool is a specific style antifreeze in that the whole entire system has to be designed for it. It is like trying to run R134a freon in an R12. Of course you are going to get all kinds of grief with gaskets and the such. The basic chemical composition of Dex-cool and a traditional glycol antifreeze are very different. Also, there is nothing wrong with running a coolant that is long life for a longer period of time. As long as you check the coolant from time to time for discoloration from contamination and the such, you will be good to go. New semi's that have engines worth as much as a new truck use this type of long life coolant as well.

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It is not a theory. They are simple "real-world" facts.

Not really. The cooling systems are physically no different. The coolant goes from the radiator thru the engine, transmission, and heater core and then back to the radiator.

This is a bad example. R134A and R12 do require 2 completely different systems to run. DEX-COOL and conventional green do not require different cooling systems and have the same chemical compostion which is ethylene glycol. DEX-COOL uses organic inhibitors and conventional green uses inorganic inhibitors.

Yes there is! As long as no more water or antifreeze is added to a cooling system, the freeze point is permanent, but the boilover and and protection points do change.

Yes and no. Semis do have a long life coolant, but it is only good for approxiamtely 300,000 miles in which it is time to rebuild the semi engine. If hte engine is fine, then they pour in a bottle which extends the life of the coolant.
BTJustice
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wrote:

What about the gasket materials, are they the same?

Just my experience, but ran the original green anti-freeze in our Dodge 024 for nearly twenty years.

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They were until GM had a recall on the 3800s. Then another recall on the intake manifold gasket bolts. Crazy stuff.

You probably didn't take any long vacations in that feat of engineering, lol.
BTJustice
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On Sun, 5 Oct 2003 05:26:31 -0500, "Buford T. Justice"

several
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http://727tj.tripod.com/omni.htm
Looks like a yard ornament now.
BTJustice
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