Re: U.S. Employment: GM vs Toyota

Just goes to show one can not believe everything one reads. Camry's made in Japan exibit at label that say most of the parts are made in NA as well
LOL

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LOL How do you know the label is inaccurate?
LOL

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You COULD be right Toyota MIGHT send steel, plastic, rubber and electronic components etc.to NA for final assembled by the Canadian and US Nippon, Stanley, Denso, Bridgestone etc. assembly plants so they can make the list of NA parts, then send them back to Japan rather than Kentucky, to be assembled in the Camry's that they ship to NA, if that seems logical to you LOL

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike hunt wrote:

Actually, they do ship some parts from the US to Japan.
<http://www.toyota.com/about/our_business/operations/manufacturing/tabc/index.html>
They also made some cars at NUMMI for export to Japan (they don't anymore).
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike hunt wrote:

That's because the AALA (the act that requires labelling of domestic content on cars) requires that all cars of a particular model show the domestic content of that particular model. However, because some of the cars are made in Japan and some made in North America, the label reflects the average domestic content of all the cars. So if all the parts were made in the US for the Camries in the US (70% of all camries sold) and all the parts were made in Japan for cars made in Japan, then the average content for a Camry would be 70%, even though the car had either 100% or 0% domestic content.
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DUH, no kidding Carnac, you are correct but if one read the label that says "THIS car line" do you think the average consumer understand that nuance? We know you live to pick out parts of any posting with which to disagree but the point of the post was that no import manufacture sell anywhere near 50% of the vehicles they sell in NA, in NA, and that is a an undeniable fact. On the other hand around 85% of what GM and Ford sell in NA is made in NA of primarily 80% NA parts. Look over all of the different Toyotas differ corporate models it should become obvious to even the slowest that the majority are made overseas

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike hunt wrote:

As you say below an import manufacturer, GM, uses about 80% NA parts. GM imports the Chevey Aveo and other cars like Saabs.

Actually, the domestic content of different US automakers include:
chyrsler 74% Ford: 81% honda 53% Nissan: 46% Toyota: 42%
Source: http://www.levelfieldinstitute.org/scorecards.html
This is also interesting:
http://www.usatoday.com/money/autos/2007-03-21-car-content-chart_N.htm

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Once again you pick and choose. When did I ever say GM did not import vehicles, or not use imported parts? What I said was what the Commerce site says, and that is around 85% of the vehicle sold in the US by both GM and Ford are made in North American of around 80% NA parts. I also pointed that no import manufacture SELL anywhere near 50%, of the vehicles they SELL in NA are made in NA, and that is a an undeniable fact.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike hunt wrote:

What commerce site? URL of the exact page, please.
> I also pointed

You need to read and understand what you read before you respond or you make an ass of yourself, yet again.
According to Level Field Institute, which is an organization funded by retired Ford, GM, and Chyrsler workers, Toyota has 42% US content and Nissan has 46% US content (on average). Those are pretty close to 50%. But Honda is over 50% (at 53%).
Again, when someone does his own homework, it makes sense for you to read what he has written and understand it (ok, i get that understanding stuff is hard for a senile old man, but try), otherwise you look like an ass.
Source: http://www.levelfieldinstitute.org/scorecards.html
Again, I also notice that you showed yourself to be intellectually dishonest by selectively deleting my comments without indicating that fact. Only an asshole would think that I would not notice.
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You need to read and understand what you read before you respond or you make an ass of yourself, yet again.
You keep choosing to mention the NA parts label on a few import brand models assembled in NA and not ALL of the models they sell in NA, in response to what was in that post.
What I said is what that the Commerce site says, around 85% of the vehicle sold in the US by both GM and Ford are made in North American of around 80% NA parts. To which I also pointed that no import manufacture SELLS anywhere near 50% of the vehicles they SELL in NA, are made in NA, and that is an undeniable fact. (Perhaps I contributed to your confusion by saying "parts" rather than "Content," such as the base materials etc. that go into those "parts." Not merely assembling imported components in NA to make those parts used in some of the models assembled in NA to qualify as NA parts)
If you can show us were you get your opinion that disputes the Commerce Department when it reports around 85% of the vehicle sold in the US by both GM and Ford are made in North American
of around 80% NA parts, then show us.
If you can show us anything that proves that any import manufacture SELLS anywhere near 50%, of the vehicles they SELL in NA that are made in NA then do so. We are all willing to lean new facts.
If you take the time to go to any GM or Ford dealership and LOOK on the window sticker, you will see it says something to the effect that 85% of the vehicles they sell in NA are made in North American. If you know that to be not true you should complain to the FTC. That is what Honda did when Toyota was saying, a few year back, that the Camry was "Made in America," when in fact it is only assembled in America. The FTC made Toyota stop putting "Made in America" on the window label and stating that in their TV ads Toyota now, at most, says assembled in the US of world sourced parts ;)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike hunt wrote:

ROTFL. I actually answered all your questions in a previous post.

In my last post, I did not say a word about the labels. Instead, I found data from an organization called Level Field Institute, which is made of retirees of the Detroit 3 automakers. They estimate the average content of all vehicles sold by some automakers, including Ford, GM, Chrysler, Nisson, Honda and Toyota. To determine the average, they take info provided by the automakers to the US Gov't about content and the number of cars sold by the automakers (<http://www.levelfieldinstitute.org/methodology_sources.html ).
I did not mention content on a few models, but, rather the average of the entire US sales of Toyota, Nissan and Honda.

What commerce site? Exact URL, please.

According to the Level Field Institute, over 40% of the content of Nissans and Toyotas sold in the US is North American content and 53% of Hondas. This is for all cars sold in the US by those car makers, not particular models.
(Perhaps I contributed to your confusion by saying

What do you "If you can show us?" I included the URL on my last post: http://www.levelfieldinstitute.org/scorecards.html

I did already.

Yet, no car sold in the US meets the requirement that all the parts come from North America. Not one, including those from the Detroit 3.
The FTC action was against Honda for its lawnmowers, not Toyota dealing with cars.
If you can show a link that the FTC took action against Toyota, show the URL.
Have a lovely day.
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
More apples and oranges comparisons, but no new facts. You are free to believe whatever you choose, but will you complain to the FTC? ;)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike hunt wrote:

Correct. I demonstrated a few posts ago that Hondas have, on average, 53% North American content (average over both the vehicles they import and make in North America), according to the Level Field Institute, which is made of retirees of the Michigan 3.
Likewise, you have again failed to demonstrate any comprehension of what I wrote.

Likewise, this shows you have no clue what you are talking about. This is not a logical reply to my last post.
Unless you are able to make a post that has any sense at all, I will not waste my time or bandwidth replying to a senile old man.
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Unless you are able to make a post that makes sense at all, I will not waste my time replying to a one who believes he knows it all, but uses figures that do not apply to what was posted LOL.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jeff wrote:

The website says the US auto industry spends $17B a year on research & development. Compare that to Intel's R&D budget of $4B, and Intel's sales are only 1/10 of Detroit's.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

To make the comparison equal, toss in markups, material cost per unit, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Their gross margin is around 25-30%. Also I was wrong about their R&D spending -- it's closer to $6B, not $4B.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.