Single vs Dual Piston Calipers??

Does anyone know first hand if Dual Piston Calipers are any better than Single Piston Calipers ?
Just wondering.
========Harryface ======== 1991 Pontiac Bonneville LE
3800 V6 ( C ), Black/Slate Grey _~_~_~296,339 miles_~_~_
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~~~The Former Fleet ~~~ 89 Cavalier Z 24 convertible 78 Holiday 88 coupe 68 LeSabre convertible 73 Impala sedan
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Harry, the only vehicle that I've ever had with 4-piston calipers on was a1968 Impala SS427 coupe and they worked very well. I don't know if they are really that much better than single piston calipers but they do cost considerably more to replace.
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Yes. Dual-piston calipers will allow a more even distribution of braking force on the brake pads. I had a 94 Jimmy, now have a 2000 S-10. The S-10 has dual-piston calipers up front and single-piston in the rear, the Jimmy had single-piston calipers in the front and drums in the rear. Now, the disc/disc vs. disc/drum may be part of the equation, but the S-10 has a MUCH better pedal feel, and I think stops better, despite having larger tires.
On Thu, 2 Dec 2004 20:48:41 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Harry Face) wrote:

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Harry Face wrote:

Well, sorta, not really. Yes and no. It depends. :)
Seriously... it really depends. In theory, yes. In theory - one piston on each side is more of an even push than one piston and sliders. However, single piston calipers are cheaper and almost as good.
Define "better." (seriously.)
Ray
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Besides the more even distribution of force to the width of the pad you will get twice the pressure that would normally be exerted on the rotor. They do generally stop you with much less peddle effort than single piston units. That is presuming they are sized correct by the designer.
Brian

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Even force distribution on both pads. Less likely to have uneven brake pad wear. As far as stopping distance. Well If the single piston assembly is working properly than it is comparable to dual piston assembly as long as the contact area from piston or pistons are the same.
my two cents!

will
do
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pad
It actually depends on the actual pressure that is behind the piston and the fact that two pistons will fit where one will and can be large enough to exhibit more pressure. The same concept applies to four valve cylinder heads, two valve that are 60% of the single valve's size will fit in it's place. Yielding you 20% more flow.
Brian
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well I know as a side effect, you can get larger brake pads (more surface area) the calipers on my monte are interchangeable with the dual piston calipers found on late model camaro's (with slight modification of the caliper bracket, the bolt hole has to be 14mm instead of 12mm)
the pads are about twice the surface area, and with a car that weighs just as much as the camaro, I'm sure theres a benefit in there somewhere.
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