99 accord le timing belt

Is there anyway to check and see if the timing belt has been changed? Pre-owned car.
Thanks,,
Pam

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If the previous owner does not have a receipt for it, you must assume it has not been changed. If you think over the logic of how you would decide when to change the belt if you don't do it now, you'll find it gets terrifying in a hurry.
There is another consideration; facing such a large maintenance expense and the poor likelihood of recovering the money when selling the car, many sellers sell the car when the belt is due. Funny how that works out.
Mike
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| > Is there anyway to check and see if the timing belt has been changed?
open the belt cover, see if belt looks new www.autozone.com/servlet/UiBroker?ForwardPage=/az/cds/en_us/0900823d/80/0c/f7/06/0900823d800cf706.jsp
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www.autozone.com/servlet/UiBroker?ForwardPage=/az/cds/en_us/0900823d/80/0c/f7/06/0900823d800cf706.jsp
ago; dusty and slightly scuffed from the tensioner. If you decide the belt looks okay, when will you change it? That is why it is mandatory to change the belt if there is any doubt. You get the security of having the new belt and you know when to change it next time.
Mike
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| A belt due for replacement should look like one that was changed a month | ago Impossible, old belts's rubber is harder & has cracks.
| If you decide the belt looks okay, when will you change it? Chk its appearance every 10k km
| That is why it is mandatory to change | the belt if there is any doubt. You get the security of having the new belt | and you know when to change it next time. Fine if user can pay, either way see www.aa1car.com/library/2003/us70343.htm para 6 2nd sentence is possible only with manufacturing defects, I think.
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change. There is no reliable visual indicator for the condition of a timing belt. When I replaced the belt on my daughter's '93 Accord it was the original with 163K miles on it. There were no cracks or anything to indicate it had almost twice the mileage limit on it.

determined by visual inspection, Honda would tell us to inspect the belt and change it when it shows cracks. Instead they say to change it on schedule. The fact is that most timing belts that fail look fine, except the missing teeth or the place where it snapped.

visual inspection method is so dangerous. They just don't look bad before they fail - after all, it isn't the rubber that holds the belt together. I guarantee it's cheaper to replace a timing belt than to repair or replace an interference engine that has suffered a broken timing belt.
Mike
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How many miles on your 99 Accord? Like my daughter's 98 Civic, I believe your belt is supposed to be changed by 105,000 miles or 7 years, which ever comes first. I replaced the Civic's belt at 99,000 miles and eight years old. Yes, it looked brand new was still tight. Remember what happens if that belt breaks! Hardly anyone changes their belts early and then sells the car.
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duckbill wrote:

it. THe carlot seller does not know, or so one of them says, who they obtianed the car from to ask, however, the sales manager told me they knoew who owned it in a separate converstation about soemthing else. We will get it changed , just wondering if there was a way to tell.
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Probably got it at auction. One of those cars the new-car dealers didn't want (bad sign). He knows perfectly well who owned it last, just won't tell you.

There is NO way to tell for sure. If you're unsure, get it replaced. The possible consequences of not doing it are rather dire.
When I buy a used car that's within belt-change territory, I factor that price into my bargaining.
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TeGGeR

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TeGGeR wrote:

I will pay him to do it. It was a new dealership that I bought it at, just on the used side of the lot. Thanks
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In that case you may still have a bargain.
Mike
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Oh, that's different. New car dealers tend to get the cream of the used-car crop.
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TeGGeR wrote:

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Nope - no way to tell. It really sucks, but I would bet heavily that at 120K miles the belt hasn't been changed. That's a big chunk of change the seller isn't likely to recover at sale time. Unless it was formerly owned by Santa Claus, you need to get it changed. Also change the water pump at the same time; a little extra now vs essentially the entire labor cost of a timing belt change if it fails later. And if the water pump fails by seizing, it will destroy the timing belt and you are back at teh wailing wall.
Mike
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