It's time to change my Timing Belt on a 95 honda accord v6...

It's time to change my Timing Belt on a 95 honda accord v6...I need
Holder handle 07jab -001020A ,
holder attachment, 50 mm 07mab -py3010a and
Socket, 19mm 07jaa-001020a
Can you tell me where I can find these tools otherthan at Honda?
tks
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Look over http://tegger.com/hondafaq/cranktool/index.html (and the next section about getting the belt on right!)
The socket is a normal 19 mm socket, but be aware the job is much easier with an impact driver, and that requires an impact socket (black). With the holder, a long breaker bar and a lot of manly muscles the bolt can be broken loose, but your manly muscles will be sore when you finish.
Mike
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I should mention - if you can get ahold of an impact driver and socket (like by renting them) you won't need the holder. This is a case of "bigger is better" on the driver, though; 400 ft-lbs is about the minimum. I used a 500 ft-lb pneumatic driver with the regulator right at the tool when we did my son's Acura, and it struggled a bit.
Don't listen to anybody who tries to tell you the bolt can be loosened by putting the handle of a socket wrench on a jackstand and hitting the starter. The engine turns the wrong way 8^O
Mike again
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thank you. My problem is finding the tools i listed. Can anyone tell me where i can find the TOOLS; other than at Honda?
Holder handle 07jab -001020A ,
holder attachment, 50 mm 07mab -py3010a and
Socket, 19mm 07jaa-001020a

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You don't need any of that stuff.
Rent a DeWalt electric impact wrench from any industrial rental place for about $25 per day. This thing will spinn the bolt off with so little effort you'll think you're in paradise.
The black 19mm deep socket can be had at any hardware store for about $10.
--
Tegger

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Tegger wrote:

should have a holding tool when re-torquing the bolt though.

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Good point, but only if you've got an automatic.
With a manual, all you need is somebody to step on the brake pedal with the tranny in gear.
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Tegger

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Tegger wrote:

still better to have the holding tool - theres a fair amount of lash in the system holding the crank with the transmission, and that affects ability to set torque correctly.
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It has no effect provided you turn the wrench smoothly, which you should be doing anyway.
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Tegger wrote:

you'd think, but in practice, it's very hard to get it right if there's too much elasticity. friction of the bolt interfaces is uneven - the more elasticity, the more opportunity for friction to momentarily lock movement. to put it another way, /you/ may be turning the wrench smoothly, but with excess elasticity, the crank is not resisting smoothly.
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Resistance is quite regular and smooth, actually. Drivetrain lash is negligible compared to the amount of compression undergone by the clutch friction disc springs.
If you have a helper step on the brakes, you feel the lash being taken up, then you feel the clutch springs compressing. It's fairly predictable, and amounts to having a really long extension on your torque wrench.
Now if you had an automatic, how would you hold the pulley still for bolt-tightening without a proper pulley-holder tool? That would be tough, wouldn't it?
When I did my wife's (automatic) Tercel's timing belt last year, I had to fabricate a simple tool to hold the pulley still. It's just a three- foot length of steel with two holes drilled in it.
http://www.tegger.com/hondafaq/misc/tercel_crank-pulley_tool.jpg
http://www.tegger.com/hondafaq/misc/tercel_crank-pulley_tool_close.jpg
Luckily, Toyota designed the pulley in such a way that it was possible to bolt a holder in place.
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Tegger wrote:

the springs are a good point - i'd overlooked that!
technically though, you can't rely on long elastic paths of travel for this stuff. if you look at strain gauges when torquing bolts, it's actually a series of lurches. springiness in the system allows more deflection per lurch, and will often omit the final stage. that's why you have torque extensions for impact tools - you can apply big torque at one end, but the other end won't over-tighten. correspondingly, "stiff" pulley bolts are devils to manually loosen with 1/2" extensions, but they come off easy with 3/4" tools. same applied torque in either case.

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Nice tool! Can you make me one? ;-)
How about putting some thin nylon rope in the number 1 cylinder as it comes up on compression stroke? Kind of a PITA, but it works.
I have heard of people using an impact wrench to tighten the crankshaft bolt. Kind of scary if you ask me...
Pigeon
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I used the Powebuiilt crankshaft tool . Got it from Amazon - Powerbuilt-648796 Crankcase PulleyRemova Tool
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Michael Pardee wrote:
snip

Awwww, you just don't want to see him flip the car over on its back!
<G>
JT
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I only tried that once, on an old Toyota. It scared the bejeebers out of me - for some odd reason I didn't expect the front of the car to rise several inches when I bumped the starter. And that was a succesful operation....
Mike
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Michael Pardee wrote:

In the "olden" days, some people would attempt to start a car by jacking up one of the rear wheels and rotating it while in gear. Quite a number went their "own" way...
JT
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Kinda like propping a small plane and finding the throttle was open a bit too far and the the plane wasn't tied down - my brother did that with his Cessna 140 :-(
It must have taken some muscle power to rotate the wheel. I suppose they used a fairly high gear?
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Michael Pardee wrote:

I never saw it in person but remember vivid tales told by my grandfather...
JT
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