Re: Ford most-considered brand 2 quarters in row in KBB study

In message < snipped-for-privacy@reserved-multicast-range-not-delegated.examp

than a conventional, or automatic box. If it's purely an automatic, can you point me to the year and type please?
--
Clive


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

AFAIK it's purely an standard hydraulic automatic.
When did the current gen Civic come out? 08? I may be remembering Honda's advertising from before the EPA tweaked the formula for estimating gas mileage.
Anyway, Honda currently specifies the highway mileage on the auto as 2mpg more than the stick, leading to an overall average auto mpg that's identical to the stick.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/16/2010 10:26 AM, Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

electronic throttle makes this possible - doesn't need to rely on wastage via the torque converter to smooth out shifting. operation is electronically controlled hydraulic.
--
nomina rutrum rutrum

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In message < snipped-for-privacy@reserved-multicast-range-not-delegated.examp

reveals that it is a conventional box and clutch setup which is hydraulically operated.
--
Clive


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It may be different in the UK than the US.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In message < snipped-for-privacy@reserved-multicast-range-not-delegated.examp

very different vehicles.
--
Clive


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes

In the U.S., many automakers' automatic transmissions have been getting equal to or better EPA fuel economy than manual transmissions for a while, even before implementation of dual clutch transmissions and electronic throttles. Even a "conventional" automatic transmission shifts more quickly than most people do with manual transmissions; the torque converter allows an automatic to stay in a higher gear longer than a manual without laboring the engine; torque multiplication from the TC helps acceleration while the lockup feature eliminates the inefficiency while cruising; and different gear and differential ratios all combine to level the fuel economy playing field between automatics and manual transmissions.
There are several reasons that automatics are now more common than manuals in the U.S. It is easier to control emissions and fuel economy with an automatic, which makes the vehicle easier to certify with the EPA; dismal traffic conditions in large cities have made use of a manual transmission more work; and it seems as if driver education programs no longer teach use of a manual transmission.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray O wrote:

I would add that there are other types of transmission out there, especially the CVT and semiautomatic, like those in some Ferraris (like I am going to ever see one other than at the auto show), where the computer actuates the clutch and matches the engine speed to road speed and gear for seemless shifts. The CVT is present in a few cars without hybrid drives (like the Ford Five Hundred) and in almost all cars with a hybrid drive, like Toyota Prius (the only exception that I know of is early models of the Honda Civic Hybrid; some trucks and buses also have hybrid drives and I presume that some of these are manual transmissions).
Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Save the manuals ! http://www.caranddriver.com/features/10q3/save_the_manuals !-car_and_driver
Lynn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.