Genesis tire pressure

I saw the pressure warning light and took the car to Tuffy #208 on 10/22/12. (I no longer use Hundai service, if I can avoid it.)
They reported all tires were low and said they brought them up to normal
pressure. They also said the tires were worn out. Nice! The car has only 21,000 miles and driven only in Naples, FL. They quoted $944.54!
This is a leased car and, by the way ... the biggest car mistake of my life. I only drive at the speed limit and never do rapid accelerations. The car is terrible and I have also had to replace the battery and have on-going issues with electrical and electronic intermittents.
So, the tire pressure warning now greets me every time I start the car! I can't wait to turn this POS car in and go on with my life beyond Hyundai.
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On Sun, 11 Nov 2012 18:51:50 -0500, "Charles"

The TPS should have gone off once the tires were properly inflated. Did it?
As for the wear, I don't understand it with your mileage. Today, most any radial is good for 35,000 to 50,000 miles. I could understand if you were a young guy hot rodding around, but for normal driving, that is excessive wear. Only reason I can think of is bad alignment from hitting curbs or potholes.
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"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message wrote:

The TPS should have gone off once the tires were properly inflated. Did it?
No it is still on.
As for the wear, I don't understand it with your mileage. Today, most any radial is good for 35,000 to 50,000 miles. I could understand if you were a young guy hot rodding around, but for normal driving, that is excessive wear. Only reason I can think of is bad alignment from hitting curbs or potholes.
SW Florida has some of the best roads in the country. Yes, I am an old fart and drive like one but still skillful enough to avoid curbs.
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On Mon, 12 Nov 2012 17:10:49 -0500, "Charles"

Could be defective and given your luck, very possible. I've had them on two cars now and the only time they went on was when a tire was actually low and it worked like it should Went off as soon as air was put in.
First thing I would to is get a good pressure gauge. I just bought one with a large easy to read dial and it was about $8. Check what the pressure should be on the door jamb and then check the tires to see if they are properly inflated. Some low profile tires need 35 psi as compared to the 28 to 30 that station have put in for years.
If all that works, could be a bad sending unit. I've heard of many people having problems with them on every make of car.
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Re the TPS not going off. On the kids Audi I mentioned it had same issue and I had to "rezero" or "reset" the system in the car maintenance system .
wrote:

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wrote:

That's extreme. All I had to do with two different Hyundais is just put air in the tire. I can, however, see where the ability to zero the system is helpful if you change to a different tire that requires a different pressure.
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This Audi works out tyre pressure from ABS signal A certain speed should correspond to a certain wheel rpm. If the wheel goes flat its a smaller circumference so wheel rpm is greater, if you overinflate, rpm is less. If you put the spare on like I did, because it was new the wheel rpm was different so the thing alarmed. After reading user manual its only 4-5 keystrokes to reset in the "menu" in the TPMS (tyre pressure management system) Seems a lot of technology to further isolate the driver from knowing what he/she is doing. Maybe I,m getting to be a cranky old sod!.
"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
wrote:

That's extreme. All I had to do with two different Hyundais is just put air in the tire. I can, however, see where the ability to zero the system is helpful if you change to a different tire that requires a different pressure.
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2012 16:53:58 -0500, "Charles"

Glad it worked for you. I don't know what the recommended pressure is on your car, but mine is 35 psi with the low profile tires. Having that message pop up constantly would drive me nuts too.
Some years ago I was driving cross country pulling a trailer with a Model A on it that my brother bought. There was a dash light on (don't recall what for) and we ended up putting a piece of black tape over it for the last 1000 miles.
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On Sat, 15 Dec 2012 19:23:38 -0500, "Charles"

First, anything I say is trumped by your lease agreement so do take a look at that. It may specify a tread depth or it may specify some term such as "useable tires" or similar.
To determine if the tires are worn, two things you can do. One is to look at the "wear bars" on the tire. That is the section between the tread, down in the grooves. Once they are worn to the point the bar is flush, the tire is considered worn. The second thing to do is actually measure the great. It should be 1/16" or more to be safe.
No ruler handy? Use a penny upside down. The top of Lincoln's head is 1/16" from the rim. If his full head shows, the tire is worn. http://www.wikihow.com/Know-when-Car-Tires-Need-Replacing
Check them now and consider that you will be driving a few more months to turn-in time. Considering the grief your dealer has given you, I'd take the car to a real tire shop a few days before and have them do a real tread check and even give you the measurements in writing. From my experience, tires today last about 30,000 to well over 40,000 miles, but there is always an exception.
The price from the dealer does not sound all that bad, depending on what they are putting on. I'd expect to pay from $150 to $250 per tire. For my car, I'd pay a bit more than what I'd buy to comply with a lease trade in.
In some states, it is not legal to sell a car with worn tires so if you don't put them on, the dealer will have to before he sells the car so he wants to put the burden on you. Take precaution, get them checked. Any tire dealer will do it for you and be unbiased.
Oh, you may also want to check out www.hyundaithinktank.com for Genesis forums as well as all other models.
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