Condensation removal....

Page 1 of 3  
Condensation on the inside windows. I hate it. How do I get rid of it? What's the cause of it? Why does it take so long to remove with the defroster? How can I seal up the outside of my car. What's the best way to
check for air/water infiltration. Ugh. Help! :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I run my AC briefly to get rid of it.
Not sure if sealing your car would help, if that were possible. Remember that condensation is due to the humidity in the air and your car would still contain air, even if sealed.
Remco
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Best way to deal with inside condensation is to use the A/C.
Best way to *avoid* it is to *clean* the inside glass surfaces. .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep. That, and tell your passengers to stop breathing.
BTW, while there are products out there that are sold specifically to curtail condensation, a bottle of windex and some newspaper works very well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah, yes. When in doubt, use the simplets option. :) Thanks.
And thanks to all who have posted. I really appreciate it.
Aaron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@databasix.com says...

Just Newspaper on it's own does a fair job, without smears if the windows are only a little grubby on the inside too. And you can dry a slightly damp window with Newspaper and clean it at the same time.
One tip, alcohol based de-icers for the outside of glass can actually cause misting on the inside because they change temperature so quickly the condensation forms from moisture in the car. You'll get less condensation if the glass is scraped without de-icer (unless it is so hard you can't shift it).
--
"Sorry Sir, the meatballs are Orf"
The poster formerly known as Skodapilot.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As others have and will state, the A/C must be run with the defroster (your A/C -is- operational, isn't it?). Also, that YOU are in the car .... BREATHING ... contributes significantly to condensation on your windows. If you get into the car with WET wearing wet clothing, this too contributes to window condensation.
--

- Philip



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If your vehicle is equipped with a manual 'recirc mode' and you are operating your heating system in the 'recirc mode,' that's likely your problem. If not, check for a heater core leak
mike hunt
ajpdla wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    Wet shoes and floor mats aggravate the situation too. bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So do lengthy discussions on the merits of Toyota vs. Honda vs. Isuzu Vs. Chrysler Vs. Ford and who shouldda wouldda won the last election
--
Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I always forget that part. The heater gets going and evaporates the water from around our shoes and mats, then the moist air hits the not-yet-heated windows.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
what about leather seats...does that add to the condensation?I have leather and this is my first winter with the car.I find it gets a little humid in there also

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't see a difference between leather and cloth in that respect. Are your seats moist when you get in?
BTW, if I ask nicely, would you please not top post?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Floor mats for sure. Damn things.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ajpdla wrote:

Sealing up your car will only make things worse - unless of course you don't have the need to breath. The moisture in your will condense on the windows. How cold is you climate? Running the A/C while heating will remove a lot of moisture. Unfortunately most A/C systems don't run once the temperature drops below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Avoid using the recirculate setting. This just allows moisture to build up in the car.
Regards,
Ed White
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
C. E. White wrote:

I don't believe this holds true for automotive systems. On my old Pontiac the A/C was directly tied to the defroster setting--switch the system to defrost, and the A/C was activated. Good way to keep the compressor oils circulating to keep the seals lubricated, in addition to removing condensation. Worked at any temp, as I recall, and I move around NY/New England.
I'll confirm this on my new 94 Civic in a few days, as it has now gotten cold enough around here to check. Disabling it below 40 degrees would be idiocy--it's the only way to remove condensation effectively. It is true, however, that many room A/Cs don't function when the outside temp is "too low"--which occasionally annoys me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It depends on the make/model. My cressida shuts the A/C off if you turn the inside temp past 75%.

It does help with condensation. There's no doubt about that.

I'm pretty sure that even in his case, it's the temp you set the control to and not the outside temp.

There's a way to fix that, put a plastic bag over the outside of the A/C after poking several holes in it. (The bag, duh). :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The deactivation on newer domestic and automotive AC's, at 40 degrees, is a federal regulation intended to save energy. Same as the limit on water capacity for toilets and the latest washing machines sold in the US. Your government at work. ;)
mike hunt
"Gary L. Burnore" wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No it's not! AC systems have always had low temp cutouts on them, and it's not idiocy for the above poster. The ac is called for anytime the defrost is selected on most cars but is prevented from cutting in below 40 F because below that temp the gaseous refrigerant will liquefy and as we all know you can not compress a liquid. It cuts it out so that your compressor doesn't smash to little bits trying to compress liquid refrigerant. Short lesson in refrigeration, compressor draws in low pressure gas, pumps out high pressure gas. High pressure gas condenses into a liquid under pressure in... what else but the condenser (that other rad in the front of your car). High pressure liquid is metered/sprayed into the evaporator where it becomes a low pressure gas again and so on.
For the OP, cars with persistant high humidity situations sometimes have water leaks that may not be apparent. I had a Supra that leaked water at the hatch. Windows seemed to fog easily. Discovered one day that the spare tire well was half full of water. Steve
wrote:

lubricated, in addition to

gotten
be
outside temp

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You certainly are entitle to your own opinion. The AC on my 83 Continental will run below 40 degrees but not my 2005 Lincoln LS or my 2003 Mustang GT. Go try a buy a three gallon toilet or a new model top loading washing machine in the US today. ;)
mike hunt
Steve G wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.