Consumer Reports testing video

Does anyone recall video footage, possibly shown on a TV news show such as 60 Minutes, NBC Dateline, etc. that documented Consumer Reports staffers attempting to produce roll-overs
in either a Suzuki Samurai or Isuzu Trooper or similar vehicle?
I recall seeing same some years ago, and being surprised at the blatant rigging of the test (the test was repeated many times without producing the desired roll-over until, to the cheers of the on-looking staffers, the vehicle tipped onto two wheels). Also surprised that mainstream media would tattletale on CR.
So far, web searches have not produced any verification.
Thanks.
Pongo 26
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I remember all the stories very well but don't have a source for the video. It probably has been pulled. CR was sued by both Isuzu and Suzuki. The case was settled out of court with details not made public as far as I know.
Isuzu and Suzuki claimed that trial lawyers paid CR to conduct the tests in their favor and both vehicles were subjected to tests that other SUV's were not subject to.
I owned a 1988 Samurai. Fun little 4x4. Never had any trouble.
Rick K wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hey Pongo 26, Found this. Maybe some of the dates will help you with a more in depth search. Hope this helps...
myTOYisaRodeo
Isuzu Case Against Consumer Reports Goes to Trial Copyright Strategic Safety, 2000 Consumers Union (CU), publishers of Consumer Reports, are defending claims of defamation and product disparagement because of its article that claimed the 1996 Isuzu Trooper was unstable and prone to roll over. As a result of its tests, CU petitioned NHTSA to recall the vehicles in 1995; however the agency closed its investigation without a defect finding. Isuzu argues that CU rigged the tests to urge NHTSA to adopt a rollover standard and to show that the 1995-1996 Isuzu Trooper would roll over during evasive and/or emergency maneuvers. The company claims that it suffered heavy sales losses after the article was published and seeks $300 million in damages. CU says this is an attempt to silence them and are defending the case on the consumers right to information. Isuzu used the agency's decision to base its lawsuit against CU (see "FOIA Abuses Undercut Public Access to Documents"). In 1996, CU performed tests on several vehicles to assess handling performance and rollover tendency. Professional test drivers performed a rapid zigzag maneuver intended to simulate what might happen if a driver had to swerve to avoid striking a child who darted into the path of the vehicle. During the tests, both right wheels of the Trooper lifted high off the pavement while rounding the turns at 33 mph. CU published the data in an article in Consumer Reports stating that the Trooper "would have rolled over completely were it not for our test drivers quick and skillful steering." After the Trooper tipped up, CU conducted the remainder of the tests with outriggers. CU reported that the Trooper tipped up on its two right wheels during 75 of 192 maneuvers. Isuzu claims that the test driver input more abrupt steering maneuvers than real drivers would ever do in emergencies. Isuzu also claims that CU falsified some of its test data, concealed other information to bolster its case against the Trooper, and that the Consumer Reports article was being written before the tests were complete. Defense expert Lee Carr testified for Isuzu in the trial that began on February 8, 2000, stating that based on his testing, the Trooper was no more prone to rolling over than any other sport-utility vehicle. He also stated that, based on his review of the CU testing, the tests did not treat all vehicles the same. CU has conducted a total of 89 tests of sport utility vehicles, minivans, and small trucks, and only the Suzuki Samurai and Isuzu Trooper have suddenly tipped up so severely that CU declared them "Not Acceptable." A companion suit by Suzuki is next in line because of CUs testing in 1988 that showed the Samurai to be highly prone to rollover. Isuzu claimed that CU maligned the Trooper because subscriptions were falling off and that CU rigged the tests to urge NHTSA to adopt a rollover standard. In June 1988, CU petitioned NHTSA to initiate rulemaking to establish a minimum stability standard and requested that the agency establish a performance test requirement for all passenger cars, utility vehicles, and pickup trucks. NHTSA stated that it would initiate a research program that could set performance criteria for rulemaking and defect investigations. However, the agency responded that the current test procedures for assessing rollover propensity were unsatisfactory because they do not provide for repeatable, reproducible results. On August 20, 1996, CU again petitioned NHTSA to initiate rulemaking to create an emergency-handling standard for SUVs. Because the agency decided against establishing a stability test in response to CU's last petition, the organization suggested that NHTSA establish a test to rate vehicle performance in emergency maneuvers. CU also asked that the rating be included in a warning, and that vehicles exhibiting a high rollover propensity be modified to achieve acceptable performance. NHTSA granted CU's petition request stating that it would initially explore whether it could develop a practical and repeatable emergency-handling test. The agency is expected to publish proposed rules for a rollover test soon.
http://www.strategicsafety.com/library/N0A03.htm
BUT, if you try to get to the site now you get:
File Not Found The requested URL was not found on this server.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://overlawyered.com/archives/00apr1.html#000410b April 10 -- Verdict on Consumer Reports: false, but not damaging. After a two-month trial, a federal jury found Thursday that the magazine had made numerous false statements in its October 1996 cover story assailing the 1995-96 Isuzu Trooper sport utility vehicle as dangerously prone to roll over, but declined to award the Japanese carmaker any cash damages. The jury found that CR's "testing" had put the vehicle through unnatural steering maneuvers which, contrary to the magazine's claims, were not the same as those to which competitors' vehicles had been subjected. Jury foreman Don Sylvia said the trial had left many jurors feeling that the magazine had behaved arrogantly, and that eight of ten jurors wanted to award Isuzu as much as $25 million, but didn't because "we couldn't find clear and convincing evidence that Consumers Union intentionally set out to trash the Trooper". The jury found eight statements false but in only one of the eight did it determine CR to be knowingly or recklessly in error, which was when it said: "Isuzu ... should never have allowed these vehicles on the road." However, it ruled that statement not to have damaged the company, despite a sharp drop in Trooper sales from which the vehicle later recovered. The magazine sees fit to interpret these findings as "a complete and total victory for Consumer's Union" (attorney Barry West) and "a complete vindication" (CU vice president David Pittle)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

--
They still use those outrigger looking devices, they managed to get a
Toyota Tacoma to come to a near roll using evasive maneuvers during
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I believe Toyota is too "big" to bully around. Unlike Isuzu. Poor Isuzu.
This disgraceful episode just expose their agenda.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.