Damn Bendix 10 ABS!

done twice! Now, the brake pedal is going to the floor(new calipers, pads, rotors a month ago). Do you think that Chrysler is going to honor the recall "lifetime" replacement? This car is beautiful, gets 22-25mgp around town with the 3.8, leather, etc. I would hate to see this car go the scrap yard because no one can fix the brake problem endemic to 90-93 Chryslers with ABS. Wish it were a lower line without the ABS and just the regular power brakes.
Reply to
sctvguy1
I have read about owners of this model converting to a conventional braking system by using parts from a donor non-ABS car.
It might be worth considering if you wish to keep it.
KM
Reply to
Kirk Matheson
I saw that article on Allpar, and it is super complicated! I don't have the money to have it done by a regular shop(if they would even do it because of the liability issues concerning brakes). I cannot do that kind of job myself, but it looks like that someone could run with the ball and do this conversion for owners like myself.
Reply to
sctvguy1

Are you sure you haven't blown a line somewhere? When the Bendix 10 puump/motor went bad in my 1992, the pedal feel was still quite hard, and you had to "stand on it" to get any brake action at all since the pump wasn't supplying any pressure. Can you hear the growl of the pump running?
Reply to
Steve Newman
Yes, the pump is running to raise the pressure. My mechanic checked everything, replace the flex hoses, etc. Thinking of checking the rear brakes, pads, springs, cylinders, etc. Is there anything else that might be doing this? He recommended a complete brake line flush. The "brake" and "ABS' lights do not come on on the dash, so this has me stumped.
Reply to
sctvguy1

Sorry I can't be of more help but the Bendix 10 monstrosity is way beyond my capability. Sounds like you need a Chrysler mechanic who is intimately experienced with it if anyone is left who is.
Reply to
Steve Newman
Do you have a solid brake pedal when the engine is turned off, but it becomes soft and goes to the floor when the engine is running?
A friend had a problem like that when he was rebuilding his '70 Cutlass. I think the problem was in the brake booster or the rod connecting the brake booster to the master brake cylinder actuator piston.
Reply to
MoPar Man
Exactly. The pedal is "hard" normal when the engine if off, but becomes so low when the engine is on. The trouble is, MoPar Man, the master cylinder and the ABS are all ONE HUGE UNIT! I have heard that without the recall, the whole thing is like $1600! I thought about that the fluid was leaking back from the master cyliner piston rod into the unit, but it is all one, and therefore, it would have to be replaced as one. What a POS system! The only reason I got this gem was to have a "drive to the doctor car with A/C". My only other car, besides my wife's 2010 Avenger is a 1941 Windsor, wool seats and no A/C. It is a bitch to even drive it down US1 and back for a short outing without taking a shower in your clothes(Hobe Sound, South Florida)
Reply to
sctvguy1
something i am curious about......try pulling the vacuum hose off the brake booster with the engine off and stick a long wire tie or wire or something to use as a make shift "dipstick" down inside the vacuum brake booster. see if you have any brake fluid leaking into the booster in other words.
not saying that's your issue just something worth looking into.
Reply to
rob
The "booster" is a sealed, nitrogen canister with about 1600 psi. There is no conventional "round" booster. If I had one of those, I would be happy, easy to fix and/or replace. There is an article on the Imperial Club website that shows where someone changed over to regular power brakes, but it is WAY too complicated, and he warns that this should not be done by anything other than an expert mechanic. So, that leaves me SOL!
Reply to
sctvguy1

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