HELP!!! Gona have me one 300C Touring Disel... HELP!!!

Hello!
I living in Sweden(North Europe).
i planing to by a 300C Touring, with the new disel 320cdi from the Mercedes.
What i is whondering is...
If the 300C touring 2,7l-3.5l or the 5,8l, has had any problem, and what type in case of problem: Electrical, bad noices in the car etc...?
How many miloes have youre car on the tripmeter.... Changing tyres yet? at what mile was it time for that...
Here in Sweden it have 225/60/18 tires byt in the state i have been told that it is typ-registred whit 17" weels what more is the tires...205-215/65-70/17 or what?
I`m going to run it as a Taxicab, so i whant it too work properly, and not having it with the car-doctor.garage...
Hope some of you can give me any ideas. Hopfully i did whrite so you did understand what i was refering to.
Have a nice day, take care...
Mike
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2BIG4U wrote:

Been there a few times. Nice place.

A diesel engine is not offered in North America for the Chrysler 300 series. Seeing that diesel fuel currently costs about 10% more than regular gasoline, I don't know why you'd buy a car with a diesel engine these days. They're noisy and they stink.

The 300 has many parts made by Mercedes (like the suspension and transmission). For us here in USA/Canada, that usually means it will be more expensive to repair these items compared to when all the parts were made by Chrysler (or - made for Chrysler) by secondary parts makers in north america. Because the 300 is an "exotic" car in Sweden, I expect you will pay a lot for replacement parts.

Most versions of the 300 have 17" wheels. The all-wheel-drive version of the 300 Touring does come with 18" wheels, and so does the AWD/RWD versions of the 300C. The SRT-8 version comes with 20" wheels (and I believe a 6.1 liter engine).
The 17" tire size is 215-65-17

I own a 2000 300M (the previous version of the 300, which is much better looking then the pimp-mobile-bently-SUV-front-end-in-your-face-no-class submarine new version which you are asking about). I am completely satisfied with how well my 300m has performed in the 5 years and 90,000 km I have driven it.

Tire life is more dependant on the brand of tire and your own driving style than on the car you put them on. That said, there are pathetically few tire choices here in North America for the 17" wheels on the 300 (215-65-17). Chrysler chose a stock tire size for the 300 where only shitty tires are available in that size.
You will be better off to change the tire slightly to 225-55-17 (more choices).

Yea, I've seen a few 300m's in Netherlands used as Taxi's.

So that rules out Volkswagen, Saab and Volvo. The 300 series has only been available for about a year. It may be too early for repair information about them.
http://autos.yahoo.com/newcars/chrysler_300_base_2005/14703/style_reliability.html
http://autos.msn.com/research/vip/Reliability.aspx?modelid 136&trimid=-1&src=GBT
Here's a web site you might find interesting:
http://www.daimlerchryslervehicleproblems.com /
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Much better fuel economy, esp in city driving. That's why even in the UK, which has been traditionally anti-diesel, the diesel car is on the rapid rise, despite the fact that the price of the fuel is about the same as petrol.
You'll have to update your view on smell when you see modern engines run on modern, low-sulfur fuel.
DAS
For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
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Dori A Schmetterling wrote:

Diesel engine costs more as an option:
"Volkswagen's midsize 2005 Passat diesel sedan has a starting MSRP of $23,360. This compares with $22,070 for a comparable gasoline Passat model." (1)
Prohibited by law:
"Diesel models are limited in their availability in the U.S. because five statesCalifornia, New York, Massachusetts, Maine and Vermont prohibit their sale due to emission restrictions." (1)
But produce more torque:
"Yet the 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine in the Passat TDI, as the diesel versions are called, puts out an amazing 247 lb-ft of torque at a low 1900 rpm vs. the 166 lb-ft of torque at 1950 rpm in the 1.8-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine in the base Passat sedan." (1)
Get better gas milage:
"Thanks to its higher energy content and its efficient combustion process, diesel performance enables cars to travel at least 30% farther on a gallon of fuel than comparable gasoline models." (2)
But the savings will take time to pay-back the initial increased cost:
"Thus, if drivers maximized the diesel's fuel economy and got the 7 extra miles per gallon, it would take about four years to recoup the approximately $1,200 extra cost for the Passat's diesel engine." (1)
Which will take more time to pay-back if diesel continues to be more expensive to buy than gasoline. And, not every urban filling station has a diesel pump. In some cases, drivers might need to venture farther from suburban neighborhoods to locate a place to fill up.
And they are noisy (more than a comparible gas engine).
Diesel is more popular in Europe because it is taxed less than gasoline:
"The demand for diesel in Europe is fueled by the high cost of gasoline. (Unequal taxation of the two fuels results in diesel costing about one dollar less per gallon in most European countries.)" (2)
It takes more oil to make a gallon of diesel than for gasoline, so the relative efficiencies of diesel and the costs to consumer due to taxation really make the attraction of diesel questionable:
"It should be noted, however, that it takes about 25% more oil to make a gallon of diesel fuel than a gallon of gasoline, so we should really look at how a vehicle does on fuel efficiency in terms of "oil equivalents." Thus, we need to adjust the mileage claims for diesel vehicles downward by about 20% when comparing them to gasoline-powered vehicles." (2)
Although diesel engines generate less carbon dioxide (only because of their slightly better fuel economy), they put out more smog-forming pollutants than gasoline engines:
"when it comes to smog-forming pollutants and toxic particulate matter, also known as soot, today's diesels are still a lot dirtier than the average gasoline car." (2)
It will take more effort and cost than it's worth to make diesel cleaner than gasoline:
"To meet the tougher pollution standards, high-tech diesel engines need low-sulfur diesel fuel. Unfortunately, US Department of Energy modeling has shown this fuel to be more oil and carbon-intensive than reformulated gasoline. Making a gallon of diesel fuel requires 25% more oil and emits 17% more heat-trapping greenhouse gases than gasoline reformulated with MTBE. Similarly, diesel requires 17% more oil and emits 18% more heat-trapping gases than gasoline reformulated with ethanol. This means that diesel fuel's advantages from its higher per-gallon energy content and better performance on greenhouse gases are partially offset by the impact of diesel's fuel-production process."
(1) http://autos.msn.com/advice/article.aspx?contentid@22630
(2) http://www.grinningplanet.com/2005/04-12/diesel-vs-gasoline-article.htm
For more info, see here:
The Diesel Dilemma Diesel's Role in the Race for Clean Cars
http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_vehicles/cars_and_suvs/page.cfm?pageID 07
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A number of your points are US-centric, others contain sweeping generalisations, others are interesting and instructive.
See below.
DAS
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The simple and best fix in the US would be to do as the military did and go over to the JP-8 spec which is good for all diesels and gas turbines. Euro on-road diesel is almost there now.
At any rate, US car buyers are not as anti-diesel as the US car dealer network is. Modern common rail tech WILL work with current US onroad diesel-the Duramax is HP common rail and runs on any US onroad diesel.
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Last year I was in the UK and had a 90 minute ride to the airport in a Chrysler diesel minivan. The only way I knew it was a diesel was because the driver told me so. It was quiet, no smell, and acceleration was no different (from a passenger point of view) than gasoline engine.

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"2BIG4U" wrote: > Hello! > > I living in Sweden(North Europe). > > i planing to by a 300C Touring, with the new disel 320cdi from > the Mercedes. > > What i is whondering is... > If the 300C touring 2,7l-3.5l or the 5,8l, has had any > problem, and what type in case of problem: Electrical, bad > noices in the car etc...? > > How many miloes have youre car on the tripmeter.... > Changing tyres yet? at what mile was it time for that... > > Here in Sweden it have 225/60/18 tires byt in the state i have > been told that it is typ-registred whit 17" weels what more is > the tires...205-215/65-70/17 or what? > > I`m going to run it as a Taxicab, so i whant it too work > properly, and not having it with the car-doctor.garage... > > Hope some of you can give me any ideas. > Hopfully i did whrite so you did understand what i was > refering to. > > Have a nice day, take care... > > Mike
I have been in touch with the cardealer, and he had neu info for mee...
it is a 3,0disel engin, vith 218horsepower and 520torq wen the engin is spinnin at 1800...
Top speed 230km/h 0-100km/h is done in 8,3sec.
And the middleconsumtion is 8-9Liter/100km
I recond thats ok for that kind of car... :lol:
Now the only thing yhat im wored about is how it will handel, in the snow, bicuse of the fat tire 225/60-18, it might be a bit of a challinge...
Take care... Mike
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