Who was it who mentioned Fram oil filters and dropping oil pressure?

Page 5 of 16  
"C. E. White" wrote:


You don't seem to quite grasp the concept of insurance. Is buying fire insurance stupid for those who are among the vast majority that never collect a benefit?
-jim
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
One of the largest oil change chains, Jiffy Lube, for instance, is owned by Pennzoil-Quaker State, and as such has an incentive to sell as much of the company’s traditional petroleum-based oil as possible."
This information is only partially correct. Shell Oil owns Pennzoil-Quaker State.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As I have said earlier, the book says 5000, less under severe conditions. The two different dealerships I have bought from recommend 3500. It is a small price to pay,and I am content with it.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hmm, a place that makes money by selling parts and service recommends short oil change intervals.... how surprising.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

As long as I get the change in under 5000k, I have a paper trail to support my warranty, and that is important to me. Although, on the Avalon, we have now had it nearly three years and there has been nothing falling off, no rattles, absolutely nothing to complain about. The warranty on this one goes 7/70.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hls wrote:

Then you should be changing your oil every 100 miles. It will have the same benefit on the longevity of the engine versus changing the oil every 1000 miles, 3000 miles, or 5000 miles--no effect at all. But it'll make you feel better.
"Recreational Oil Changing
The term "recreational oil changer" was coined to define people that change their oil far more than necessary because they actually enjoy doing it. It's easy to understand the psychology behind the recreational oil changing. It's the visceral feel of the tools, the victory when that old oil filter breaks free, the hot dark oil pouring out, the joy of oiling of the gasket on the new filter, that new copper or fiber gasket on the drain plug, the clean clear oil going in, and the sense of accomplishment when you start the car, the oil pressure light comes on for a moment, then goes out. For $8-10 in oil and parts, it's pretty cheap entertainment, but if people would be content to do it only when it provides some benefit to the vehicle it would be better."
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Quoting your ideas as facts, with no scientific supporting information. You do what you want, and I'll do what I want, okay?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But I suspect not for the reason you think. A lot of the problem is the position of the filter. And lots of older cars had the filter mounted where it drained easily. It's not due to the condition of the engine. Remember, I had this problem with a brand new rebuilt engine that ran great, and it never did it again after dumping the Fram filter. My engine was not a beater and the oil pump was brand new.

They filter ok, but like one said, who cares if the valve doesn't work worth a hoot, and it's a proven fact that they don't.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@wt.net wrote:

I've seen rebuilt engines that are beaters.

It's not a fact and your account of one experience is hardly proof. The studies I have seen give the drain back valve on Fram a good rating. Your proof is one experience against millions. Any filter's drain back valve will leak if a piece of crud happens to prevent it from sealing. That possibility is most likely on a freshly rebuilt engine.     And the drain back valve have nothing to do with the operating oil pressure, which was the topic of this thread.
-jim
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jim wrote:

Everyone who's ever owned a car with an "upside down" oil filter knows that Fram ADBVs suck. They don't work more often than they do, or at least that was the case the last time I used one, 15 years ago.
If they can't manage to make something as simple as an ADBV work, that doesn't say a whole lot for their overall quality, and I don't feel the need to roll the dice with my engine when a better filter is easily available for the same price.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nate Nagel wrote:

Yeah and everybody knows the moon is made of green cheese. BTW which way is upside down for a filter/
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jim wrote:

Base up. Base down doesn't require an ADBV unless there's a siphon effect somehow.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nate Nagel wrote:

FRAG! I knew what I was thinking, but typed the exact opposite.
Base UP (as in a SBC and most other old school V-8s with an integral filter mount) is "normal." Base DOWN (e.g. slant-six, Porsche 944, old Ferrari V-12, etc.) *requires* an ADBV, either as part of the filter or part of the base.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nate Nagel wrote:

OK. I almost asked which side of the filter you called base. FYI unless you have a leak in the plumbing or oil pump, there should always be a syphon back to the pan even if the filter has the inlet facing up. If there is no check valve that keeps the oil from draining back to the pan it will syphon back.
     My personal experience is that I know for a fact that large fleets of b-100 dodge vans with slant sixes were using Fram filters back in the 70's (early 80's too IIRC) without any problem. So I tend to believe mechanics that I know were handling Fram filters every day versus believing someone whose stated position is they never ever handle a Fram filter.
    I recall there was an issue with the slant six oil filters. Sometime back in the 60's or early 70's they changed the size of the filter on some slant sixes to a shorty version (IIRC trucks had an extra heavy duty version). The problem was some people used the old long filters thinking that would give them better protection. What happened when the long filter was used in this application was the filter would have an air pocket trapped in the top of the filter. That air bubble would be compressed when the engine was running and the filter behaved more or less normally while the engine ran. But when the engine was turned off the compressed air bubble would expand and push the oil out into the engine. That meant when you re-started the engine it need to push that quart or so of oil back into the filter before the engine would get any oil pressure. An incorrect interpretation of what was happening under those circumstances may be how this superstitious belief about Fram filters and slant sixes got started.
-jim
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Most filters have an anti-drainback valve (or if not, then there is usually one elsewhere in the system). On Ford modular V8, if you get a filter with a marginal anti-drain back vlave, then you are likely to get chain rattle if the engine sets over an extended period of time. The cam drive chains are tensioned by oil pressure, and if the oil drains out of the system, it take a heartbeat to build up pressure to the point that it can tension the chains. During this period, you can hear the chains rattle.

Fram filter may be just fine 99% of the time, but I don't like the way they are made. I don't like the paper end caps, the sloppy gluing, the crummy bypass valve, or the hard rubber anti-drain back valve of the standard orange FRAM filters. The higher priced Tough Guard filters are better, but cost more than better quality Motorcraft or Wix filters.

You can find plenty of horror stories regarding FRAM filters. I am sure you can find some related to other brands as well, but I think FRAM filters have generated more horror stories than all the others combined.
I don't buy the compressed air theory. I've seen filters installed at all sorts of angles. They all get air in them when the engine is shut down.
Ed
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 19:09:33 -0500, Nate Nagel wrote:

Interesting, since they are 'made' by Honeywell, which is a fairly reputable company.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

They were junk when they were Allied Signal, and when they were their own company before that. Who the "banker" is doesn't improve quality.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

way, WAY back in the day, they were apparently pretty good. And from what I've heard the media in their air filters is decent, it's just the *construction* of the oil filters that is suspect.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Their quality "went south" in the late '60s or early '70s in a big way. That said, they were NEVER as good as a Wix or a Hastings / Casite even back then.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 21:49:44 -0500, clare wrote:

LOL! But, adding to another part of this thread, whatever happened to Lee? I used them in all my Toyotas until ~1986 and had no problems at all with them!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.