Spark plug torque value for 2000 Dodge Ram 1500 Van, V8 5.2L

I am sorry for posting this again. Forgot to mention that I am looking for the spark plug torque value.
The Haynes manual says its 30 Ft-Lbs and it looks a bit on the higher
side to me. Can anybody who has done the job before confirm it.
Also, I am assuming 30 Ft-Lbs is without applying some anti-seize.
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Why would you make such an assumption? If an anti-seize compound is recommended, then that torque spec has to include it or it is simply worthless. 30 FT-LBS is not all that high and it seems to take a hell of a lot more than that to break the damn things free :-0
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25-30ft.lbs. is about right... I go by another rule of thumb... if the spark plug uses a crush washer, I go finger tight plus a half-turn. If it uses a flat washer, go finger-tight plus 1/16 of a turn.
You can use a bit of anti-sieze if you want - but I've never found it all that necessary... most decent plugs will already have a coating on the threads, and if they're changed when they're supposed to be (every 30K miles or 2 years), siezing (in iron heads, anyway) is rarely a problem. Over-torque 'em, or leave 'em in for 100K, and yeah... you just might wind up snapping them off.
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Tom Lawrence wrote:

I haven't either except in the case of aluminum heads. Dissimilar metals leads to galling.
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Without a doubt... aluminum heads are a whole different story. Never try pulling plugs from a hot (or even warm) engine with aluminum heads - always do it cold.
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30 ft-lbs pounds might be a little too much. My book calls for 30 inch-pounds, which is about finger tight plus 1/16 of a turn. I didn't believe it either, but I did it anyway expecting many leaks. Nothing bad happened. I was happy.

25-30ft.lbs. is about right... I go by another rule of thumb... if the spark plug uses a crush washer, I go finger tight plus a half-turn. If it uses a flat washer, go finger-tight plus 1/16 of a turn.
You can use a bit of anti-sieze if you want - but I've never found it all that necessary... most decent plugs will already have a coating on the threads, and if they're changed when they're supposed to be (every 30K miles or 2 years), siezing (in iron heads, anyway) is rarely a problem. Over-torque 'em, or leave 'em in for 100K, and yeah... you just might wind up snapping them off.
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The FSM indicated 30 foot pounds (31 Newton-meters). It has no listing in the inch pounds column. This is for factory plugs, which do use a crush washer. Perhaps you mis-read it.
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The FSM is wrong on one of those torque figures. 30 ft/lbs is about 40.7 Nm, and 31 Nm is about 22.9 ft/lbs.
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The FSM isn't wrong - I just can't type :) It says 41Nm.
In the immortal words or the late great Don Adams, "Sorry about that, Chief"
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