Re: 5.0 V8 Camshaft Synchronizer

Hello Fred.. Hey I have the exact same thing going on with my 5.0 L explorer at this time. How did you find replacing the syncronizer shaft? Was it easy top just
drop into the hole where the old one came out or was it a bit of hit and miss to align the gears properly?
I will be doing mine early next week. Any tips? You can email me at: snipped-for-privacy@telus.net if you like.
Thanks, Ken
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It was actually pretty easy, I basically set the engine to #1 top dead center by aligning the timing mark and index. I then took off the cam sensor from the top of the cam synchronizer. To see the "C" shaped vane's postion. I move the plug wires and coil packs out the the way, I removed the plugs wires from the coil just to avoid messing them up internally by pulling and stretching them, I then removed the bolt and pulled the synchronizer out paying attention to how much the vane turned as I pulled it out. I bought the part you have to dip the lower end of the new synchronizer in engine oil up to just below the mounting flange before installing it in the engine.
There is an alignment tool which I have but didn't use (it arrived a few days after I replaced the synchronizer) What the tool does is keep the vane in a certain postion as you install the synchronizer in the engine and it has an arrow on the tool so that you keep the syncronizer in position towards the radiator so the when you put the cam sensor back on top of the synchronizer it is lines up with the electrical connector.
Looking at the tool and the old synchronizer I can see I was real close if not exactly on when I put the new synchronizer. Some day I may just reinstall the new synchronizer using the alignment tool just to go through the motions. Currently the truck runs fine so I am in no hurry to do this.

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Hey thanks Fred. So is this not where you adjust the engine ignition timing, or is that "old" technology?
From what I understand, you simply pull one out and drop in the new part, keeping the connector facing the same way. If you have the position different from the factory setting, (by a few degrees) is the timing not out of whack now?
Or maybe the the newer Ford's don't "time" from this any longer? Any thoughts?
Ken
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On an older engine with a distributor this is where you would adjust ignition timing.
The factory service manual says "Ignition timing is preset at 10 degress BTDC and is not adjustable"
The service manual also says to set cylinder # 1 to 0 degress TDC on the compression stroke before removal of the camshaft positon sensor and camshaft synchronizer.
Regarding ingnition timing, my assumption that setting 0 degrees TDC and installing the camshaft synchronizer correctly (with the special tool or without it if done carefully) will get you close, the computer takes over from there

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ok..sounds good. I figured that the stator on top would adjust itself to the proper timing position.
Ken
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Ignition timing is controlled by the CRANKshaft sensor. The only reason for the camshaft sensor is to indicate to the ECM which stroke cylinder #1 is on during cranking; i.e., compression or exhaust. Once the ECM knows the correct stroke, the camshaft is not used for the rest of the trip. The engine will actually run fine without a camshaft sensor (that is if the sensr is not squeeling as mentioned earlier). The only noticeable difference would be that the engine may crank longer before engine start. This is because the ECM must determine cylinder identification by observing crankshaft acceleration after firing cylinder #1 at TDC. There is a 50% chance the ECM will fire correctly on the first try without the camshaft sensor. If firing is correct, the crank will accelerate.
You could adjust ignition timing by monkying with the crankshaft sensor. But most find it easier to put an aftermarket chip on the engine.
Hope this helps,
tom
wrote:

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Hey thanks for the tips Tom. I wasn't wanting to change the timing per se, BUT I was curious to know how I could screw it up by getting the install of the cam sensor wrong. LOL
Thanks again
Ken
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