1991 2.0 timiming belt

The timing belt broke on my parents 1991 Camry 2.0. I was reading the chilton book on how to change it but it list 3 different type 2.0 motors. If anyone could help me identify
which motor it is and any tips on changing it I would greatly appreciate it . Thanks Den
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I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw den630 wrote:

Haul it to the dealer. That's the easiest way.
If you've never done one and get the timing wrong there can be all kinds of troubel Find someone who's done one before and watch and learn. Since the belt broke, the timing is lost and it's a *real* pita!
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Long answer: Get the VIN# (vehicle identification number) and date of manufacture from the steel plate near the driver's door. Toyota parts department can look up the correct parts for you.
Be forewarned - it is easier and cheaper to have the dealer change the belt for you. While the actual belt is only around $30 and the service specials are usually around $199 installed, by the time you buy the tools needed to do the job properly, you'll spend that much or more, plus it will take some time to do it right the first attempt, and of course, you'll need mechanic type work clothes and not mind getting grease under your nails. For me, it is well worth doing because I plan on keeping the car forever, so once you learn you can do it again. Second, I like seeing, hands on, how things actually work. Third, I trust my own work more than I trust the commercial mechanic on a time schedule often trying to finish the job more quickly and improve their earnings. I take my time, it's like a meditation or prayer, things flow, no rush, everything just fits together as it should, and then I'm more comfortable driving the car because I know everything has been assembled with care and done correctly. My suggestion, if you don't have the passion and interest, just let the Toyota shop do the replacement. It's a common repair, they've got the tools and experience and it's no big deal that way. But, if you like doing your own maintenance, (I wouldn't have it any other way), then read on. I spent around three years reading these newsgroups before changing the timing belt and picked up lots of tricks and pointers for making the job go smoothly, and then developed a few of my own along the way. First, I decided to do the complete job and replace all parts and seals. If the timing belt broke, there may be other maintenance related items that also need attention. I wound up doing the following: Timing belt, idler and tensioner bearings, crankshaft and camshaft oil seals, oil pump seal and O-ring, oil cap gasket, spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, rotor, distributor cap "packing" (gasket), valve cover gasket, PCV valve, PCV grommet, gas cap replacement, fuel filter, distributor O-ring, oil pan gasket, transmission pan gasket, alternator brushes, thermostat, radiator cap, water pump, check valve clearances, check chassis mounting points torque, set ignition timing, differential service. Ask if you have more questions. I'll just describe the timing belt, bearings and seals. My Camry was in good condition, 120,000 miles, dealer serviced by the prior owner, but there was slight seepage at the oil seals, and the idler and tensioner bearings made noise when turned by hand. To change the water pump you need to take everything all apart again. I'd recommend you do it all. Here's where doing your own work starts to pay. I shopped the parts list on the Internet and estimate my net parts cost, installed by the dealer would have cost around three times as much with their labor and parts markup included. In doing this work, I found three wrong or damaged parts installed by others in the past, so that's another benefit of doing your own work. If you take your time and do it right you know it's done correctly. Damage or errors I found were: chipped crankshaft power steering pulley and dented oil pan edge from someone (unbelievable - Dealer receipt for prior work) prying instead of using the correct puller, thermostat "jiggle" valve in the wrong position even though there is a cast in mark in the water inlet to show where it's supposed to go, FIPG (form in place gasket) material at all the water pump connections to the point of slightly obscuring openings, and two (2) stripped transmission pan bolts. Onward. Tools you should have: (this is for your 2.0 litre four cylinder - six is different) electric impact wrench to remove crankshaft bolt ( a cheap version for around $50 is fine) harmonic damper (or steering wheel) puller with 6mm bolts ( I had to get the 6mm separately from the Toyota dealer) I got the damper puller from ToolSource.com, and the next parts from them also: Special tool to install the camshaft oil seal (the camshaft oil seal is close to the strut tower so there is limited clearance). Apparently, you can also remove the upper camshaft bearing cap if you don't have the tool, but the head is aluminum and you need to re apply FIPG sealant to avoid oil leaks if you remove it. The cam seal installer was around $50 but made installing the seal extremely simple and very easy to do. If you're changing the fuel filter the trick part is a 14mm crow foot flare wrench. I bought the single piece from Tool Source made by S-K to get the quality fit and finish. Fuel line came off in two seconds after soaking in Kroil for two days. Also, from Tool Source got a "hook and pick" set for removing seals. You can use a screwdriver with tape over the end, but if you scratch the journals the new seals will leak. I also purchased one of those inexpensive rubber (neoprene?) strap wrench sets on sale for under $10 to hold the oil pump gear when removing the nut from the shaft. You'll also need an inspection mirror and round wooden toothpicks with pointed ends for aligning the camshaft gear timing marks. Not required, but very handy, and a good excuse to get them: GearWrench brand reversible ratchet metric combination wrench set - especially handy for the top two timing cover bolts. You'll also need a torque wrench. I have both click type and beam type, but the inexpensive beam type only will do just fine and can be more accurate. Of course, you need a basic socket set. Mostly 12mm and 14mm plus 19mm for the crankshaft bolt and 30mm for the valve covers. May as well use 6 point sockets. I see no need for 12 point when you're using a ratchet handle, and the six point are less likely to round a bolt head. You should also have a 14mm and 13mm combination wrench. I used these often by linking or "daisy chaining" the open end of one wrench into the box end of the other to double the leverage for removing bolts that were tight in areas of limited clearance. You should also have some red color grease for the oil seals. Trick number one: Remove the crankshaft pulley before removing the engine brace that supports the engine moving control rod. That way you can reach the bolts from beneath. Others have said this is the toughest part of the job, but by working from below makes it _much_ simpler. By the way, you should get the Haynes manual in addition to Chilton, have heard it is better and more complete. Factory manuals from eBay are also nice to have. In any event, you will want to observe torque specifications. If you have the damper puller and impact wrench, removing the crankshaft pulley should be easy. Before you take it off, line up the small notch in the edge with the "zero" degree mark on the timing cover. You'll want to do this with the number one piston at top dead center. Number one piston is the one closest to the front (timing belt side) of the engine. The distributor cap should be marked and you can verify the rotor is pointing the right direction. If you're changing the spark plugs, you should remove them to make turning over the engine easier and more precise, and you can also verify by sticking a wire through the hole to see that piston is at the top of its stroke not the bottom. Actually, there's really nothing terribly difficult about this whole procedure. You just proceed logically from one step to the next. The crankshaft oil seal has a metal backing. With some trepidation, I center punched it and drilled a small hole with tape on the drill bit except for around 1/8" at the end, then hooked the hook from the hook and pick set through the hole and pulled hard with both hands. The plastic handle came off, so I used vice grip pliers on the metal ears of the shaft. Pulled again with both hands and nothing happened. Closed my eyes, focused and pulled a bit harder and the oil seal popped right out without having any sharp metal parts touch the crankshaft. You can unbolt the oil pump cover and remove it by prying carefully on the edges with a screwdriver - first one side then the other. It will move only a tiny bit at first but then come loose. With the strap wrench and impact wrench the oil pump shaft nut spun off instantly making seal replacement easy with the cover removed from the car. I used Berryman B-12 Chemtool to clean the parts. I used some of the red grease to hold the thin O-ring in place on the block when re installing the oil pump cover and also used some red grease on the pump gears as assembly lube and to assist in priming the oil pump on start up by making a better seal. To reinstall the crankshaft oil seal I used a $3.00 makeshift tool - an ABS plumbing pipe "WYE" fitting with 2" diameter from Home Depot. The arm branching off makes a convenient handle for holding it in place while using a 6 lb. short handled sledge hammer to drive in the oil seal flat and seat it fully. I was able to push in the oil pump shaft seal fairly easily with my fingers. The red grease is for assembly on the inside of the oil seals. I had a tough time positively locating the timing mark for the camshaft pulley even when using the inspection mirror and a shop light. There is a small hole in the pulley and a small mark behind it. The small mark in the camshaft bearing shell is a short vertical groove. Even when I moved the pulley to one side and painted the groove white, I still had a hard time seeing it. Finally hit upon the idea of using a round wooden toothpick with a pointed end. When I placed the toothpick through the small hole in the camshaft pulley I could easily detect the grooved line immediately behind it by moving the toothpick slightly from side to side and this proved to be a reliable and accurate method for aligning the timing mark. Then I could confirm with the mirror, but as I've said, I found it difficult to locate it just by looking. The camshaft oil seal comes out easily with the hook, because there is no metal backing. If you have the special tool, installing the new seal is almost too easy and only take a minute or two. You will need to remove the valve cover and hold the camshaft with a wrench on the "flats" cast in the camshaft to keep it from moving while removing the bolt holding on the camshaft timing gear. When installing the timing belt keep it free from oil and don't twist it more than necessary. Bear in mind the tension on the front part facing the radiator needs to be tight when lining up the notches in the belt with those on the pulleys. The "back" part of the belt around the tensioner bearing and oil pump doesn't matter - you want the front part where the tension will be on the belt during operation with the crankshaft turning clockwise and pulling on it. There is a trick to tensioning the belt properly. First, always use a new spring on the tensioner pulley. Then apply lots of force to the tensioner pulley with the adjustment bolt slightly loosened to tension the belt. This way you're stretching the belt and then allowing the spring to maintain the correct tension. Do not rely on the spring alone to tension the belt. It won't work well that way. I used the large hook from the hook and pick set to pull up with both arms. Fortunately, that plastic handle was stronger and I could exert my full strength, pulling up hard enough to move the whole engine several times. Then release the tension and let the new spring hold the tensioner pulley in place while tightening the adjustment bolt, and then finally tighten with a torque wrench to specification. Put the crankshaft pulley back on and turn the engine over two full revolutions, then double check the timing marks. Then remove the crankshaft pulley again to re install the engine moving control rod support brace. I wound up replacing the engine moving control rod because there was some slight cracking in the rubber. The small tube of "dielectric grease" you can get for under $3 for electrical parts, is actually silicone grease and I coated the new rubber parts on the engine moving control rod with silicone grease to extend their life. Be sure to use Toyota FIPG material at the points indicated in the Haynes manual around the camshaft bearings when reinstalling the valve cover gasket. Also first clean the mating surfaces with solvent so they are oil free. The correct torque for the valve cover nuts is 17 ft. lbs. not 29 as listed by Haynes. The 29 ft. lbs. number is for the base of the spark plug tubes when reinstalling them into the head. For the top you use only 17 per the factory service manual. All the rest of the Haynes torque figures are correct. Do torque the spark plugs and the other fasteners. Use a very small amount of anti seize compound on the spark plug threads. I bought a new 5/8" spark plug socket, and the first time I used it the rubber insert came off - stuck to the spark plug at the bottom. It could not be removed with a long wire hook, so I removed that spark plug, re installed the rubber socket insert and reinstalled the plug with the plug just barely inserted in the rubber insert - just enough to hold it in place, no more. The factory manual recommends coating the O-ring on the water bypass pipes with soapy water prior to assembly in the water pump. There may be other pointers, but that's basically it. Really, the 4 cylinder Toyota is fairly simple to work on. Once the wheel is removed, access is not bad, and the design is excellent in terms of quality and precision. Take your time if you decide to tackle it, or here's all the work you'll be saving if you let someone else do it. :-)
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identify
A great post, Daniel. It takes time to write with such detail.
I dont wish to be critical, but I saw one thing which is a no-no, but in the context of what you were doing, has little significance ie don't use grease to pre-lube engine working parts. Petroleum Jelly is the go here. Grease has minute fibres in it to make it jelly-like, and in the prescence of engine heat, will melt leaving the fibres behind.
I hasten to add again, that the small amount you applied on the oil-pump rotor will not cause any problem. I on the otherhand used a lot to pre-lube cam, main and bigend bearings in a Ford 6 once. The bottom of the sump had a layer of fibres in it, when I had it off a few years later.
Jason
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the
grease
has
pre-lube
a
with your help the job wasn't too bad. I also replaced the water pump while I had it apart. Thanks again for all the help.
Den
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Yes, had heard about petroleum jelly - saw the grease idea on "Horsepower TV" - they used it when assembling an oil pump, and as you say it was only a very small amount.
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