Brake caliper/pad "retaining" clips

I've just replaced the front discs and pads on my wife's 20-year-old Ford Puma, and I have a query about the so called retaining clips. They
are made of highly tempered steel wire and the free ends plug into holes in the caliper. They have loops which hook behind lugs on the caliper carrier. They look like this:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/292224457537?ul_noapp=true
According to my Haynes Fiesta manual (Haynes don't do a Puma manual, but the running gear is the same as a 1995-onwards Fiesta) they look like this when fitted:
https://app.box.com/s/jelr78aedt1uandeka74e05dnqjc8bq8
Anyone know what their function is? Is the middle bit supposed to contact the back of the pad? Mine don't - by 2 or 3 mm - see:
https://app.box.com/s/b8vaov18obat0kvldauu8bzt5r16vjrx
Sadly, I didn't make a careful enough note of what they originally looked like before I removed them. I wonder whether I have put them back correctly - but I can't see any other way they could go. The loops look as if they should go further onto the lugs - but if I tap the free ends further into the holes, they pivot on the caliper body and the loops move *outwards* rather than inwards.
Any informed comment will be greatly appreciated.
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Roger
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On Sat, 25 Jan 2020 20:23:58 +0000, Roger Mills wrote:

Aren't they meant to stop the shim that the caliper "floats" on from floating away ?
Other designs I've seen are simple bent wire pins that go into holes on the shims.
I think they're recommended to be replaced every time they are removed, but generally that's overkill.
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On 26/01/2020 10:58, Jethro_uk wrote:

Don't think so. There are no shims on my setup. The single piston caliper can move sideways on its guide pins in order to centre the pads on the disc. But no shims to "float away".
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They're not retaining clips. They are correctly anti-rattle springs. Which may also reduce the chances of brake squeal.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 26/01/2020 11:14, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

You mean that they stop the caliper from rattling on its carrier? In that case, mine are probably fitted correctly. Do they look ok to you? [Link to photo in my original post]
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Just had a look - sorry, not familiar with that type of caliper.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 26/01/2020 12:28, Roger Mills wrote:

I think the wire loop at the upper end could do with being pushed a bit further in.
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On 27/01/2020 07:52, Peter Hill wrote:

I agree that it looks that way - but if I try, it pivots on the caliper and starts to push the raw end out of its hole. It should move further in as the pads wear - but may take a while. the previous ones lasted 20 years!
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On 25/01/2020 20:23:58, Roger Mills wrote:

Youtube is a good resource for reference.
Look at 50s into this, it's for a Ford Focus but looks the same as yours:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWNT3Sa0pFM

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Good guide - and the end of the video shows the clip is not in contact with the pad. Very odd section on bleeding the brakes . . .
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On 27/01/2020 17:14:25, RJH wrote:

I did think the bleeding of brakes was a little short of the mark. Also very little fluid came out after unscrewing the caliper implying the pipe was clamped somewhere.
I have used gravity to bleed brakes with a lot of success. It very much depends on the vehicle.
Also no torquing done on those sliding bolts.
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On 27/01/2020 17:14, RJH wrote:

Bleeding?! I wouldn't drive that car after what he did - would you?
I'm not sure how usual it is to replace just the caliper, retaining the old disc and pads.
But as far as removing and re-fitting the spring goes, it was good!
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On 28/01/2020 10:55, Roger Mills wrote:

If they are in good nick why not?
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On 28/01/2020 11:21, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Under what circumstances would you replace the caliper? Surely, unless it was physically broken - which that one didn't appear to be - it would be cheaper to refurbish it with new seals, etc.
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On 28/01/2020 12:02, Roger Mills wrote:

Not nowadays, most calipers are quite cheap, and the skills needed to rebuild one properly are sadly lacking. The last ones I remember doing needed 8 pistons plus seals, over two hundred quids worth 20 years ago.
Same with most parts now, cheaper to buy a unit than fix the old.
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On 28/01/2020 12:02, Roger Mills wrote:

It can be as cheap to replace sometimes. I bought a pair for my kitcar and as a company was selling off old stock, it cost me less than £25 for two brand new calipers!
When one of the calipers on my wife's car seized, it was time that was the decider. A refurb kit would have taken two or three days to arrive, but I could pick up another caliper in an hour.
SteveW
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On 25/01/2020 20:23, Roger Mills wrote:

That spring wire pulls the caliper toward its bracket, taking up any play on the sliding pins, and stops the caliper shaking about. It does not touch the pad. New ones are easily obtained, running without them will not stop the brakes working, but you might get sqeal or shudder.
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