Lidle on offer Battery Tester

Lidle are doing a special offer Battery and Alternator tester.
I understand their stuff is good, but can this be a real piece of useful
kit for just £2.99 ?
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Reply to
john.west
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In message , "Dave Plowman (News)" writes
For casual use, you can get a decent multimeter for less than a tenner. Accuracy-wise, I have a couple that compare well with my much-more-expensive Fluke. [But, of course, they could all be equally wrong!] However, the one thing that cheap meters rarely have is AC current. Also, you may need to be a bit circumspect about the insulation quality of the test leads if you use the meter to measure really high voltages.
Reply to
Ian Jackson
In article ,
One of the most annoying bits about some meters is cheap inflexible test leads. Even Fluke expect you to pay extra for decent leads with the variety of connectors you need in practice. Hence worth paying for one which includes them. There are plenty out there at a decent price - but not below a tenner.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
However, the one thing that cheap meters rarely have is AC
Probably just as well.
A meter with an AC current measurement facility will just tempt beginners into possible dangerous activity, like trying (for lack of understanding) to measure the current *across* real voltage sources.
Without a decent fuse an explosion of the meter itself would be the end of game response for the unfortunately applied short circuit.
Reply to
Adrian Caspersz
In message , "Dave Plowman (News)" writes
Both of my cheapies have very flexible leads.
One of the advantages of using a cheap multimeter for the car and other odd jobs is that you don't mind if it gets damaged or lost. They are ideal for lending to friends and next-door neighbours!
Reply to
Ian Jackson
In message , Adrian Caspersz writes
You can just as easily try to measure a voltage using the DC current range. [Trust me - I'm and electrical engineer, and I know about such things!!!] Fortunately, my Fluke does have a fuse (which works) - and when I bought a replacement, I also bought a spare. But yes - cheap meters may not be fused.
Reply to
Ian Jackson
On Fri, 13 Jan 2017 16:11:21 +0000
I had one at work that got run over by a golf cart, on concrete. It survived, if looking slightly worse for wear. It eventually died when I tried to do the afore-mentioned test, checking AC volts with a DC current setting. Not being adequately fused, it went POP and let the smoke out. The circuit fuse blew, I'm glad to say. Luckily, I had a spare meter available.
Reply to
Davey
Ooo, thanks for that idea.
Now, can anyone recommend one guaranteed to blow up when used with mains?
Reply to
Robin
If it looks like the insides of this ...
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Seriously, some of these things can be unfortunately lethal, even in experienced hands.
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Reply to
Adrian Caspersz
In article ,
My first DVM, which cost rather a lot from Maplin, in the days when they were an electronics store, blew up when checking mains voltage.
What appeared to have happened is dirt or whatever (after lots of use) caused it to track across the rotary switch contacts.
I'll no longer use a DVM for such things. Have a dedicated mains test meter.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
In article ,
Until you drop it.
Sell it on Ebay and buy something practical. Will likely cost you less than a new set of batteries for your AVO.
But I do have one. Looks very pretty sitting on the shelf in its nice leather case.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
Me too. But I won't use it on mains or other potentially dangerous sources 'cos the leads have rotted. (I know I could buy replacements but I only keep it really from nostalgia.)
Reply to
Robin
But my car info center will show battery voltage before and after start up. How is this tool useful?
I don't like the oil filter tool shown, how can it move around the filter if space is tight? I use an old tool with the steel belt which can very easily move around and lock for either direction.
Wiper blades at £4.99 is a snip, I think to buy those. About £20 at halfords.
Reply to
johannes
In article ,
Many cars have no way of showing battery voltage.
Last time they were on offer, they had pairs were one was the correct size for the front and one correct for the back on my old Rover. So two sets gave me new fronts and the single rear plus a spare rear. For a lot less than I could buy them anywhere. Although the rear did need a slight mod to fit.
Perhaps not quite so good as Bosch blades, but excellent value.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
In message , "Dave Plowman (News)" writes
Pound Shop/World (I think it's World) do universal (more-than-long-enough) rubbers (can't remember if it's one or a pair). They look good, but mine only lasted for a few months before it started to split. However, for a pound, it's a handy spare for temporary use.
Reply to
Ian Jackson

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