Rust killer

Hi, Is there any substance out there which will entirely neutralize rust and effectively kill it so it cannot continue to do any damage beneath the
surface? I'm talking here specifically about exterior steel body panels. Take a wing for the sake of argument. Say there is active corrosion in one part of this wing. Say we use something physical like a grinderette to remove all but the pitted areas. We need to fill the damage in with P38 or whatever, but if we don't completely kill the rust in those pockets it will eventually break through to the surface again. Is there any chemical product on the market that renders the remaining rust as harmless as if we were filling and repainting on top of 100% bright metal? Thanks!
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Al wrote:

No. If there were, it would be available on the shelves in places like Halfords.
In about 1965 over the school summer holidays I worked for an uncle who ran a car repair shop. He had a Rolls in for remedial work - a small rust spot on the wing. He cut out the damaged metal - a piece about the size of a saucer - and welded in new. Then re-sprayed the whole car.
--
Graham J

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On Sat, 19 May 2018 07:07:23 +0100, Graham J wrote:

That seems like *monstrous* overkill to me. Especially on a roller which in those days at least had about 15 coats of paint each rubbed down by hand IIRC! I'm wondering if body solder ("lead loading" as we called it back in the day) would hold any remaining rust back? I'm *sure* I used to know the answer to that when I was younger but senility marches ever onward. :(
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On 27-May-18 6:47 PM, Cursitor Doom wrote:

Guy I went to college with had a Porsche 912. A 911 body-shell with a 2L flat 4. He used an arc welder with carbon arc rods to run braze over the whole car. Took engine out, wings etc off.
He still had it 20 years later when someone T boned him. Insurance paid out and he kept salvage. Sold the remains for the same again.
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It can work a bit better than some fillers over rust as the heat of the torch plus the flux does tend to kill off rust.
But the big problem is most rust has actually started from the back of the panel (where there is little or no paint when built) and any treatment from one side only likely short lived. Except for cutting out and letting in new steel - which can be done from one side.
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Best way is to use a small diamond burr in a drill to grind out those pits. And likely go through the panel in places forcing a proper repair.
All those fancy rust cure paints etc simply treat the top of the rust. They don't get behind it to stop even more forming.
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On 19/05/2018 11:14, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Seems that if there ever is an oil leak under the car, such areas never rusts..
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johannes wrote:

I used to get my Ford Cortina oil sprayed underneath. It still rotted.
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On Sat, 19 May 2018 14:55:44 +0100, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

That's not what he said, though, Mr Pounder Esquire. Oil leaks are on- going; getting your car undersprayed with oil is a one-off event as it were. The constant oil mist from a leak is a very effective rust-preventer indeed.
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Cursitor Doom wrote:

It was done three times per year and the Cortina still rotted.
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You should have used proper cavity wax. Doesn't run off like oil. No point in protecting the outside of something when it is rusting from the inside.
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*IF ONE SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMER DROWNS, DO THE REST DROWN TOO?

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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Hey! The oil spray used to cost me two quid! Two quid was two quid in those days. A pint of lager in the rough end was 30p.
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On 19/05/18 16:39, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Our first new car was Ziebarted. It seemed to work well, until some scrot stole it. ;-(
Ziebart went under but the product itself seemed good enough. Our car was 'like new' when it was stolen, it was about 7 years old. At the time that was good for an Escort.
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Brian Reay formulated on Sunday :

Cars are very much better nowadays, the steel is, or the protection. No rust at all on my Rover at 14 years next month. Like new underneath still, even on its original brake pipes and original exhaust.
My rule was to keep them until the first serious rust appeared.
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On Sun, 20 May 2018 19:59:11 +0100, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Wouldn't it have made more sense to sell it just *before* the first serious rust appeared? ;-)
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On 19/05/18 14:55, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

Waxoyl is good stuff, if you get it on early in the car's life. I had an Escort which was in good condition, I had it steam cleaned and Waxoyled it.
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I've had some serious rust-buckets in my time - so I've has some experience (and occasionally a fair degree of success) in fighting rust.
If the underside already has a thin-ish layer of mud - or it's pretty clean, but has some mud lodged in the nooks and crannies - it's probably best to first spray with some oil that's going penetrate and soak into the mud. When the mud is saturated with oil, finish off with something thicker and more robust. A suitable combination might be a coat or two of Waxoyl thinned with turps or paraffin, and then a coat of neat Waxoyl.

--
Ian

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As witness mini sub frames, did anyone ever change a front one ever;?...
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On 19/05/2018 11:14, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Even worse, post-VOC2010 they have become water based too, so utterly useless for most automotive or agricultural applications unless you can get down to almost degreased bright metal, and if you have managed that, why bother with Kurust ?.
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If the surface is badly pitted, it will be impossible to get down to bright metal.
Kurust is intended to react with the rust and passive it, but if some of the rust is deep, but it can't do that all the way through - and the rust can break out again.
One approach I've used is rather counter-intuitive, and that is to flood the rusty areas with something which WILL penetrate it fairly well - ie penetrating oil. When this has sunk in, do it again with something more permanent, such as WD40. [No arguments about WD 40, please - it DOES leave an oily film.] After the WD40, clean and de-grease the surface - but not so enthusiastically that you take away the oil that has (hopefully) got well into the rust. The surface of the rust must obviously be sufficiently grease-free that it will take Kurust. primer, filler, paint etc, but beneath it the rust still has to be sufficiently oily that it is deterred (in reality, usually 'delayed') from breaking out again.
Of course, if possible also treat the underside of the rusty surface with anti-rust oil - as that's often where the surface rust is really coming from.
--
Ian

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