VW Diesel Heaters and petrol stations

My 09 Reg Touareg has a diesel heater under the near side front wheel arch. As I understand it this kicks in when the engine is cold; can't reme,ber
if it runs alongside the engine, or just runs after you turn the engine off if everything is still cold.
I do know that after a very short run from cold you can get a cloud of fumes out of the near side as this thing fires up.
So - given that at one time you couldn't even fart let alone use a mobile phone in a petrol station without being told you risked an explosion, how does having diesel burning on some kind of metal screen become safe?
Cheers
Dave R
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On 15/03/2018 16:43, David wrote:

no more dangerous than every vehicle being driven into the fuel station. Any vehicle can drop red hot bits off the engine/exhaust or eject lumps of burning coke out of the end, header pipes glow red during and immediately after a run. Catalytic converters sit there almost glowing, starters and alternators spark, even hot brake pads/discs could start a fire, drpping your keys could give a spark. It is rare a fuel station fire is, and usually caused by a crash or deliberate ignition.
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On 15/03/2018 17:45, MrCheerful wrote:

Contrary to popular belief, even petrol is not all that inflammable. Chucking it on a barbecue or bonfire not such a good idea because there may be a lot of heat there, so it rapidly converts to vapour.
I used to know a guy who did those "exploding car crashes" for the TV. Apparently the recipe was an ounce of gelignite inside an old style metal gallon motor oil can, filled up with petrol. Triggered by a standard detonator of course.
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Well you *can* stub a cigarette out in a bowl of it. All those films showing petrol being ignited by a cigarette end, total bollocks.
Tim
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On 16/03/2018 07:41, Tim+ wrote:

Thank you. If it is cool, and you are quick enough, it can put out a match.
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MrCheerful wrote:

The issue with mobile radios is the chance that when transmitting there is enough RF energy coupled into a something that looks electrically like a coil with a spark gap - and the spark then occurs in an explosive vapour. Not very likely in the open air, but a potential problem on oil rigs, see:
https://www.arnolditkin.com/practice-areas/oil-rig-explosions/safety-on-oil-rigs/
However sparks from other electrical switches are an equally likely cause, see http://www.hse.gov.uk/comah/buncefield/buncefield-report.pdf on page 11 para 14. In this case it is something of a surprise that the firewater pump was not "intrinsically safe". In a coal mine or similarly enclosed space the specification would likely have called for it.
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On 15-Mar-18 8:34 PM, Graham J wrote:

USA allows people to fill a vehicle with the engine running and they have latches on the pump nozzle so they can wander off while pumping 20 gallons / 100L (F150 has 26 US gallon tank).
While they are not touching the earthed pump nozzle or the vehicle they are building up a static charge. They return to remove the nozzle and pull a spark from the nozzle when they discharge the static. There are a number of petrol station fires in the USA every year due to this, sufficient that petrol station fires can't be considered uncommon. Very very rare and unheard of in UK as we are not allowed latches on the pump nozzle so can't wander off.
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On 16/03/2018 07:40, Peter Hill wrote:

There are many Youtube videos also showing the results of latching petrol pump dispensers where the driver leaves the nozzle in the in the filler tube and wanders off, presumably to pay. On returning they forget about it and drives off. In most cases the pump hose separates from the pump but in rarer cases the car topples the pump which sometimes results in a fire.
In around 40 years of driving I usually filled my tank each time I purchased petrol. In that time and on at least 2 occasions I've had the pump automatic fill detection fail and the pump has continued to deliver petrol to a full tank rather than cutting off.
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