Okay, it's September

Here 'round Philly, we've had two ...uh... interesting winter seasons in a
row, so the odds are that we'll have a mild winter this year. That being
said, TFrog is probably not going to go into winter with its present tires.
Blizzaks? On a '93 LX 5.0 hatch with manual transmission?
Discuss.
dwight
(CFrog is a convertible with automatic, and, although I've just had new
tires put on that, it's not available on snow days. The automatic just makes
it sit and spin in the slightest snowfall.)

Reply to
dwight
That's why we have an Escape. Two years ago, we got a total of 4 feet of snow in two seperate storms - I joked with my neighbor that I was now the proud owner of two 1993 5.0 doorstops.
I know that when there's even 3" or more on the roads, I'm probably not going anywhere. What I HATE is when it snows during the day and then I have to try to drive home, sometimes before the snow plows come through. That's always an adventure (mantra: don't stop... don't stop... never stop).
dwight
Reply to
dwight
dwight,
I remember those days. If you recall I grew up in Michigan, where less than 4" didn't make news. Less than 4" was just brush-it-off-and- go weather. Now to answer your question seriously, I'd go with the Blizzaks tires, PLUS a few bags of kitty litter (for added weight over the axle & traction if you get stuck) to put in the hatch.
Patrick
Reply to
patrick.mckenzie84
Well, I'm sure you know that my lack of knowledge of driving in sneaux is only superseded by my lack of knowledge of Blizzaks.
Reply to
WindsorFo
Okay, but what did sneaux-bound people do before four wheel drive? Apparently some driving had to be possible?? I mean when the lastest and greatest was a '62 Bonneville....
Reply to
WindsorFo
Yes, there was a time when every driver had to deal with a rear-wheel-drive vehicle in snow, many with manual transmissions. I lived in such times, and I pride myself in being able to handle snow, generally.
The problem comes not when I'm out blowing around the snowdrifts and having fun, but in rush hour traffic, in long lines of cars inching ahead, and knowing that there's either a stop sign or a red light at the top of every hill.
In fact, one of the scariest moments in TFrog came with less than 1/2" of snow on a road that sloped off to the right. Every forward motion brought me closer and closer to going off the road - I had no traction that would allow me to steer back to the left. Only a passing garbage truck/plow made it possible to get out of that situation. I was very close to having to arrange a tow.
And I would have been mortified.
d
Reply to
dwight
I ran Blizzaks (and, later, Graspics) on my '98 manual GT with decent (accident-free) results for its entire 12-year life. And I live in a rather hilly town 20 miles north of Boston where it *does* snow. Some added weight in the trunk also helps. My GT was my daily driver, including years of commuting to work.
The downside was the need to change 4 tires twice a year, a multi-hour procedure using the Mustang's jack on one tire at a time, even though I did have the snows on a set of (ugly) steel wheels. I always got a rush of happiness when I replaced the snows with the performance radials on the (optional and snazzy) 17" wheels.
FWIW, my 12-year old GT was terminated by my 17-year old boy who failed practical physics by expecting a slick street to have the same traction as a dry street. So now he's taking AP Physics; go figure.
Semi-related note: my '98 GT was replaced by a '11 Fusion, with a real backseat and without the clutch that my wife never mastered. While the Fusion has zero excitement, everything works, and the fit and finish is the equal of anything from Japan. Ford has paid serious attention to quality, and it shows.
Reply to
Bob Willard

Site Timeline Threads

MotorsForum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.