Stay AWAY from Regina, Saskatchewan!

Roads with glass embedded in them? Like to shred tires over time?
Like to have to walk on it?? This is one of the stupidest ideas I've
seen in ages. Whatever happened to the 1970's idea of putting
shredded tires in roads to make them more resilient and less likely to
crack?
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Reply to
Rich
Shredded tires in the road didn't turn out too well. They repaved a county road by me back in the day with that, it is a curvy road, they had a tremendous amount of spin outs and wrecks when it rained. Seems tire oils leached out of the road and when wet it was making unpredictable loss of grip on the curves. Not much unlike how ice has gives no warning. Kinda like how a road gets after a diesel spill occurred on it. They repaved the six mile stretch about 8 months later.
Reply to
repairman54
In article ,
Glass mixed in with the asphalt is a great idea, it's sealed in and doesn't shred tires. The glass doesn't hurt anything, and makes the asphalt last longer. The glass is crushed as tiny as fine sand. It's mixed where they make the asphalt. A great idea.
Glass mixed in with the sand, or whatever is the base material, under the road is not good. It ends up on the unpaved shoulder of the road where it can blow around and get into your eyes and even your lungs. The glass is NOT sealed in. I was sure no one did this. It seems like old news to me but I may be confusing this with something else. It can stick to your shoes and socks, clothes in general, and gets all over the place. This of course is bad news especially if someone has to cut through the road or tear it out one day.
If I had more time I'd look this up.
I seem to recall seeing a before and after picture of a road that was repaved with an asphalt/glass mix, and the "after" picture showed the new street glistening a little from the glass. It was pretty cool.
Reply to
twk
Glass does not form spherical shapes when crushed, it forms shards, long, slender needles, no matter how small they crush it. God help any kid in bare feet!
Reply to
Rich
On Wed, 10 Aug 2011 18:27:29 -0700, Rich rearranged some electrons to say:
Crushed glass, or cullet, is not much differnt than any other aggregate used in paving. The so called "glassphalt" does not use glass crushed into sand sized particles, it is used as aggregate, recommended size of 3/8" or smaller. However, it has to be carefully controlled and applied correctly or the pavement surface will not have as much traction as conventional asphalt. Glass is also more expensive than aggregate, so there really isn't any incentive to use glassphalt. A few decades ago, there was not a way to recycle it, so some companies got it for free. Now, it is recycled, and glass bottles are not as prevalent as they were (think milk and soda bottles), so cullet is more expensive than regular aggregate.
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Reply to
david
On Wed, 10 Aug 2011 18:27:29 -0700, Rich rearranged some electrons to say:
Crushed glass, or cullet, is not much differnt than any other aggregate used in paving. The so called "glassphalt" does not use glass crushed into sand sized particles, it is used as aggregate, recommended size of 3/8" or smaller. However, it has to be carefully controlled and applied correctly or the pavement surface will not have as much traction as conventional asphalt. Glass is also more expensive than aggregate, so there really isn't any incentive to use glassphalt. A few decades ago, there was not a way to recycle it, so some companies got it for free. Now, it is recycled, and glass bottles are not as prevalent as they were (think milk and soda bottles), so cullet is more expensive than regular aggregate.
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Reply to
david

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